Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mammography has low risk of recall for false positive findings

23.08.2004


A new long-term study finds over 20 years, only one in five women who have mammograms every two years will have to undergo follow up evaluation for a false positive finding. Only one in 16 will have an unnecessary invasive procedure over two decades. The study, published August 23, 2004 in the online edition of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, should reassure physicians and patients that the risks of breast cancer screening are minimal given the notable benefit of breast cancer screening. The abstract of this article will be freely accessible via the CANCER Newsroom upon online publication.

Breast cancer screening by regular screening mammography has a proven benefit to saving lives. However, false positives and subsequent recall for follow up evaluation create significant psychosocial distress.

The extent of false positive recall is unclear. Previous studies have claimed the cumulative risk of a high false positive recall over the years was significant. However, the estimates and conclusions made to date are weakened by flawed study designs.



Solveig Hofvind, M.Sc., and her colleagues from the Cancer Registry of Norway reviewed data of 83,416 women from the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening program, a uniform national program providing biennial screening mammography for women who are 50 to 69 years of age.

The authors found that women who begin biennial screening mammography at age 50 or 51 and participate in screening for 20 years had a cumulative 20-year risk for false positive recall of 20.8 percent. The risk for undergoing invasive procedures with benign findings was considerably lower at 6.2 percent. Most of those were for fine needle aspiration (3.9 percent). Only about one in 66 women had a core biopsy with benign findings (1.5 percent). Fewer than one in a hundred women had open biopsy with benign findings (0.9 percent).
Given this low 20-year risk level, conclude the authors, "all the estimates seem to be quite acceptable and ought to be communicated to the target group."

Article: "The Cumulative Risk of a False-Positive Recall in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program," Solveig Hofvind, Steinar Thoresen, Steinar Tretli, CANCER; Published Online: August 23, 2004 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.20528); Print Issue Date: October 1, 2004.

David Greenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.interscience.wiley.com/cancer-newsroom

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Self-organising system enables motile cells to form complex search pattern
07.05.2019 | Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

nachricht Mouse studies show minimally invasive route can accurately administer drugs to brain
02.05.2019 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Successfully Tested in Praxis: Bidirectional Sensor Technology Optimizes Laser Material Deposition

The quality of additively manufactured components depends not only on the manufacturing process, but also on the inline process control. The process control ensures a reliable coating process because it detects deviations from the target geometry immediately. At LASER World of PHOTONICS 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be demonstrating how well bi-directional sensor technology can already be used for Laser Material Deposition (LMD) in combination with commercial optics at booth A2.431.

Fraunhofer ILT has been developing optical sensor technology specifically for production measurement technology for around 10 years. In particular, its »bd-1«...

Im Focus: The hidden structure of the periodic system

The well-known representation of chemical elements is just one example of how objects can be arranged and classified

The periodic table of elements that most chemistry books depict is only one special case. This tabular overview of the chemical elements, which goes back to...

Im Focus: MPSD team discovers light-induced ferroelectricity in strontium titanate

Light can be used not only to measure materials’ properties, but also to change them. Especially interesting are those cases in which the function of a material can be modified, such as its ability to conduct electricity or to store information in its magnetic state. A team led by Andrea Cavalleri from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg used terahertz frequency light pulses to transform a non-ferroelectric material into a ferroelectric one.

Ferroelectricity is a state in which the constituent lattice “looks” in one specific direction, forming a macroscopic electrical polarisation. The ability to...

Im Focus: Determining the Earth’s gravity field more accurately than ever before

Researchers at TU Graz calculate the most accurate gravity field determination of the Earth using 1.16 billion satellite measurements. This yields valuable knowledge for climate research.

The Earth’s gravity fluctuates from place to place. Geodesists use this phenomenon to observe geodynamic and climatological processes. Using...

Im Focus: Tube anemone has the largest animal mitochondrial genome ever sequenced

Discovery by Brazilian and US researchers could change the classification of two species, which appear more akin to jellyfish than was thought.

The tube anemone Isarachnanthus nocturnus is only 15 cm long but has the largest mitochondrial genome of any animal sequenced to date, with 80,923 base pairs....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new manufacturing process for aluminum alloys

19.06.2019 | Materials Sciences

Inhaling air pollution-like irritant alters defensive heart-lung reflex for hypertension

19.06.2019 | Health and Medicine

Innovative powder revolutionises 3D metal printing

19.06.2019 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>