Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Influences on quality of life in early old age

17.01.2003


A golden early old age is within sight for many people, says new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, which demonstrates that the good life is much less influenced by your past – the job your father had, for instance – than by the present, when two of the most important influences are having choices about working or not working, and having friends in whom you can confide.



"Good quality of life in early old age is a realistic ambition for all", says the research team, headed by Dr David Blane at Imperial College of Science Technology Medicine, London, "to the extent that it is possible to free the present from past influences". Early old age, sometimes called the Third Age, between 55 and 75 years old, is the phase of life between leaving the labour market and the onset of physical dependency.

The study on what influences quality of life draws on data from childhood, which was collected between 1937 and 1939, data on their adulthood and cross-sectional data on their early old age, followed by a survey of 282 people in different areas of Britain. This included a measure of quality of life in early old age developed as part of the study.


The findings:

>> Health and socio-economic factors naturally have a bearing. The quality of life for the affluent-healthy is higher than for the deprived-sick. People who are affluent, but also sick, have lower life quality, as do people who are healthy but also deprived. The quality of life of a person in poor health, however, is poorer than for a person who is healthy but who is economically deprived.

>> Having control over when and when not to work has a significant bearing on quality of life. People who choose to retire early and those who opt to work beyond normal retirement age enjoy better quality of life than people who have had the decisions made for them, because they have been made redundant, for instance, because economic circumstances have forced them to carry on working beyond the age at which they had expected to retire, or because ill health prevents them from staying in work. The issue of choice seemed to be more important for people classified as ’socially disadvantaged’ than those who were ’advantaged’.

>> The quality and density of a person’s social network was more important than the number of people in the network.

>> The neighbourhood seems to have little influence except in the negative sense. Not being able to get away from an area which suffers from various nuisances, and where there is a fear of being robbed, has a negative impact.



For further information, contact Dr David Blane, tel 020-7594-0789 email: d.blane@ic.ac.uk , or contact Iain Stewart or Lesley Lilley, External Relations Division ESRC on telephone 01793-413032-413119.

Iain Stewart | EurekAlert!

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht When a fish becomes fluid
17.12.2018 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

nachricht Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests
11.12.2018 | Columbia University Irving Medical Center

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists to give artificial intelligence human hearing

19.12.2018 | Information Technology

Newly discovered adolescent star seen undergoing 'growth spurt'

19.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>