Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

HCFC gases - Study shows 65% of cooling installations still use HCFC gases

11.07.2008
8 years after introduction of legislation, and with only 17 months left before ban, study shows 65% of cooling installations* still use HCFC gases

The results of a new study sponsored by refrigerants manufacturer, DuPont, show that 65% of cooling installations in 9 key EU markets* continue to function on HCFC refrigerant gases, raising questions about the level of preparedness in the market for the EU ban on virgin** HCFCs. The ban, based on EU legislation introduced in 2000 following on from the Montreal Protocol, will be introduced from January 2010.


Photo: DuPont
While 67% of survey respondents have shifted to use of HFCs in some or all of their systems, a full 65% still had installations running on HCFCs.

Spanning across industry sectors representing the largest users of refrigerants, the survey’s respondents use various types of cooling installations, all of which still contain significant banks of HCFCs, ranging from 57% of chillers (lowest) to 76% of air conditioning installations (highest). Although awareness levels of the legislation are high – 90% of respondents claimed to be aware of the impending ban – the large banks of HCFCs that remain suggest that this has not been coupled with a sense of urgency to ensure compliance; of those who have not yet taken action, 17% claim to have no intention to do so.

With an estimated 130,000 tons of HCFC gases still in use throughout several million installations across the EU, primarily in the form of R22, tens of thousands of these installations will need to be serviced every week in order to ensure compliance by 2010. For companies that are reliant on refrigeration, delayed action – or inaction - can pose a threat to business. The large number of remaining HCFC banks means that as more and more businesses begin to react to the legislative imperatives in the run-up to 2010, there will be a significant strain on contractor services. Furthermore, manufacturers are expected to scale down their production of HCFCs from mid-2009. These twin factors threaten to create a bottleneck, incurring costs for businesses that delay their response.

A number of HCFC users intend to wait for the ban on recycled HCFCs to be introduced in 2015, in the belief that there will be a sufficient supply of reclaimed R22. However, given the high cost of the recycling process, current projections place the availability of recycled R22 at only 15% of the amount needed to service remaining installations using HCFCs.

DuPont is conducting an informational campaign on the EU ban on HCFCs to help users understand its implications and the options that are available to them. DuPont has also developed its own solution for cost-effective retrofit of installations in the form of ISCEON® HFC Refrigerants. Further information on the campaign initiative is available at the website www.wakeup2phaseout.eu.

For further information on the wakeup2phaseout campaign, please contact Anna Riley at anna.riley@akkanto.com or on +32 (0)2 674 22 58.

* Based on a cross-industry study in 9 key EU markets (UK, Ireland, France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands and Poland) between April and June 2008.

** Virgin hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) can be defined as those that have never previously been placed on the market.

DuPont Fluorochemicals is a leading global supplier of refrigerants, using science and technology, market knowledge and global reach to provide sustainable materials and solutions to enhance personal comfort, enable food preservation, improve industrial processing and reduce environmental footprints.

DuPont is a science-based products and services company. Founded in 1802, DuPont puts science to work by creating sustainable solutions essential to a better, safer, healthier life for people everywhere. Operating in more than 70 countries, DuPont offers a wide range of innovative products and services for markets including agriculture and food; building and construction; communications; and transportation.

The DuPont Oval, DuPont™, The miracles of science™, and ISCEON® are registered trademarks or trademarks of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company or its affiliates.

FLCH-EU-2008-09

Editorial Contact
Horst Ulrich Reimer
Phone: ++49 (0) 61 72/87-1297
Fax: ++49 (0) 61 72/87-1266
E-Mail: Horst-Ulrich.Reimer@dupont.com

Horst Ulrich Reimer | Du Pont
Further information:
http://www.dupont.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Drought hits rivers first and more strongly than agriculture
06.09.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie

nachricht Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise
23.08.2018 | European Geosciences Union

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Goodbye, silicon? On the way to new electronic materials with metal-organic networks

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz (Germany) together with scientists from Dresden, Leipzig, Sofia (Bulgaria) and Madrid (Spain) have now developed and characterized a novel, metal-organic material which displays electrical properties mimicking those of highly crystalline silicon. The material which can easily be fabricated at room temperature could serve as a replacement for expensive conventional inorganic materials used in optoelectronics.

Silicon, a so called semiconductor, is currently widely employed for the development of components such as solar cells, LEDs or computer chips. High purity...

Im Focus: Storage & Transport of highly volatile Gases made safer & cheaper by the use of “Kinetic Trapping"

Augsburg chemists present a new technology for compressing, storing and transporting highly volatile gases in porous frameworks/New prospects for gas-powered vehicles

Storage of highly volatile gases has always been a major technological challenge, not least for use in the automotive sector, for, for example, methane or...

Im Focus: Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

When we put water in a freezer, water molecules crystallize and form ice. This change from one phase of matter to another is called a phase transition. While this transition, and countless others that occur in nature, typically takes place at the same fixed conditions, such as the freezing point, one can ask how it can be influenced in a controlled way.

We are all familiar with such control of the freezing transition, as it is an essential ingredient in the art of making a sorbet or a slushy. To make a cold...

Im Focus: Micro energy harvesters for the Internet of Things

Fraunhofer IWS Dresden scientists print electronic layers with polymer ink

Thin organic layers provide machines and equipment with new functions. They enable, for example, tiny energy recuperators. In future, these will be installed...

Im Focus: Dynamik einzelner Proteine

Neue Messmethode erlaubt es Forschenden, die Bewegung von Molekülen lange und genau zu verfolgen

Das Zusammenspiel aus Struktur und Dynamik bestimmt die Funktion von Proteinen, den molekularen Werkzeugen der Zelle. Durch Fortschritte in der...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Conference to pave the way for new therapies

17.10.2018 | Event News

Berlin5GWeek: Private industrial networks and temporary 5G connectivity islands

16.10.2018 | Event News

5th International Conference on Cellular Materials (CellMAT), Scientific Programme online

02.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nanocages in the lab and in the computer: how DNA-based dendrimers transport nanoparticles

19.10.2018 | Life Sciences

Thin films from Braunschweig on the way to Mercury

19.10.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

App-App-Hooray! - Innovative Kits for AR Applications

19.10.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>