Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Melanoma lurks in larger skin lesions

23.04.2008
Skin lesions that are about the size of a pencil eraser are more likely to be melanomas, a deadly form of skin cancer, than smaller moles, according to a new study led by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers.

In a new study published in the April issue of Archives of Dermatology, the NYU researchers confirm that an important warning sign of melanoma — moles that are larger than 6 millimeters, the size of a pencil eraser — is still valid. In recent years, some researchers have argued that strict adherence to this guideline may make clinicians miss smaller melanomas.

“Diameter is a reasonable guideline to pay attention to and we did not see any reason to change it,” says David Polsky, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of dermatology and associate director of the Pigmented Lesions Section in the Roland O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at NYU School of Medicine, who led the study.

“Lesions that are smaller than 6 millimeters are unlikely to be melanoma. New and changing lesions are the most concerning, and lesions that are multiple colors are especially suspicious,” says Dr. Polsky.

More than 20 years ago, NYU dermatologists developed a widely used rule, the ABCD acronym, for recognizing growths on the skin that could be early melanomas. They recently added the letter E to the list. The warning signs are: A for asymmetrical lesions; B, lesions with irregular borders; C, lesions with multiple colors; D, for lesions larger than 6 millimeters; and E for evolving lesions that change in size, color, shape or symptoms such as itching over time.

The incidence of melanoma continues to rise. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2008 there will be 62,480 new cases of melanoma in the United States. About 8,420 people will die of this disease this year. Excessive exposure to sunlight, a fair complexion, a family history of melanoma, and numerous moles, among other factors, place people at higher risk for the disease.

In the new study, Dr. Polsky and his colleagues used a computerized imaging system to measure the lesions in a large database of melanoma cases. They evaluated the lesions of 1,323 patients undergoing biopsies of 1,657 suspicious pigmented lesions. Based on their analysis, 804 or 48.5 percent of the lesions were larger than 6 millimeters in diameter and 138 or 8.3 percent were diagnosed as melanoma. Invasive melanoma, which has penetrated deeper into the skin and is most life threatening, was diagnosed in only 13 or 1.5 percent of 853 lesions that were 6 millimeters or smaller in diameter. By contrast, the invasive type was diagnosed in 41 or 5.1 percent of 804 lesions larger than 6 millimeters.

In situ melanomas, which are less dangerous because they remain in the skin’s outer layers, were diagnosed in 22 or 2.6 percent of 853 lesions 6 millimeters or smaller in diameter and in 62 or 7.7 percent of 804 lesions larger than 6 millimeters.

The co-authors of this study include: Naheed R. Abbasi, MPH, MD, Molly Yancovitz M.D., Alfred W. Kopf, M.D., Iman Osman, M.D., Robert J. Friedman, M.D., Darrell S. Rigel M.D., from NYU Langone Medical Center, and Katherine S. Panageas, DrPH, from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Dina Gutkowicz-Krusin, Ph.D., from Electro-Optical Sciences Inc., and others.

Jennifer Berman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nyumc.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras
16.04.2019 | ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences

nachricht Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in Global Change
28.03.2019 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors

For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. They used diamond quantum sensors to determine the strength of the magnetization of individual atomic layers of the material chromium triiodide. In addition, they found a long-sought explanation for the unusual magnetic properties of the material. The journal Science has published the findings.

The use of atomically thin, two-dimensional van der Waals materials promises innovations in numerous fields in science and technology. Scientists around the...

Im Focus: Full speed ahead for SmartEEs at Automotive Interiors Expo 2019

Flexible, organic and printed electronics conquer everyday life. The forecasts for growth promise increasing markets and opportunities for the industry. In Europe, top institutions and companies are engaged in research and further development of these technologies for tomorrow's markets and applications. However, access by SMEs is difficult. The European project SmartEEs - Smart Emerging Electronics Servicing works on the establishment of a European innovation network, which supports both the access to competences as well as the support of the enterprises with the assumption of innovations and the progress up to the commercialization.

It surrounds us and almost unconsciously accompanies us through everyday life - printed electronics. It starts with smart labels or RFID tags in clothing, we...

Im Focus: Energy-saving new LED phosphor

The human eye is particularly sensitive to green, but less sensitive to blue and red. Chemists led by Hubert Huppertz at the University of Innsbruck have now developed a new red phosphor whose light is well perceived by the eye. This increases the light yield of white LEDs by around one sixth, which can significantly improve the energy efficiency of lighting systems.

Light emitting diodes or LEDs are only able to produce light of a certain colour. However, white light can be created using different colour mixing processes.

Im Focus: Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. In the dysprosium gas these properties are unprecedentedly long-lived. This sets the stage for future investigations into the nature of this exotic phase of matter.

Supersolidity is a paradoxical state where the matter is both crystallized and superfluid. Predicted 50 years ago, such a counter-intuitive phase, featuring...

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...
All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Hopkins researchers ID neurotransmitter that helps cancers progress

26.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors

26.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Liquid crystals in nanopores produce a surprisingly large negative pressure

26.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>