Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pilot clinical study into iPS cell therapy for eye disease starts in Japan

31.07.2013
RIKEN is pleased to announce the launch of a pilot study to assess the safety and feasibility of the transplantation of autologous induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell sheets in patients with exudative (wet-type) age-related macular degeneration

This study, led by Masayo Takahashi M.D., Ph. D. of the Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, and conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Biomedical Research and Innovation with support from the Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, has been approved to proceed following review by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare and is scheduled to open patient recruitment on August 1, 2013.

Age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of visual impairment in the elderly, and affects up to 1% of people over 50 years of age in Japan. Wet-type AMD is characterized by progressive damage to the retinal pigment epithelium, a protective layer of non-neural cells located adjacent to the photoreceptors at the back of the eye, due to leakage caused by neovascularization.

Currently available drug treatments for this disease focus on inhibiting neovascularization, but do not repair damage that may have already occurred prior to administration. A number of previous studies have tested the use of RPE cells from various sources, such as fetal tissue or unaffected parts of the RPE, for transplantation but have been complicated by problems of immune rejection or the need for invasive harvesting procedures.

The protocol for Takahashi’s new pilot study involves the establishment of autologous iPSCs from each of the research participants, which will then be differentiated into RPE using a novel technology that allows these epithelial cells to be transplanted in monolayer cell sheets without the use of synthetic scaffolds or matrices. The cell sheets will be shaped into 1.3 × 3 mm grafts and transplanted into the affected site of a single eye, following excision of the damaged RPE and neovascular tissues.

Transplant sites will be monitored closely for functional integration
and potential adverse reactions for an initial intensive observation
period of one year, and subsequent follow-up observation for three
years. Production and validation of the autologous iPSCs and subsequent RPE cell sheets will take approximately 10 months, and will be conducted at a certified clinical-grade cell processing center. The initial three transplants will be conducted at intervals of at least eight weeks; the following three will be performed after a preliminary safety evaluation period.
This pilot study follows on extensive preclinical safety and feasibility
testing, including evaluations of cell morphology, physiologic activity,
gene expression, immunogenicity, and tumorigenesis in rodent and
non-human primate models. The results of these preclinical studies have been submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
A website describing the research protocol and other details of this
pilot study will be launched by RIKEN and the IBRI to promote public
awareness and understanding of this research program.
Media enquiries should be directed to ips-amd@cdb.riken.jp
Alternatively please contact:
Juliette Savin
Global Relations Office
RIKEN
Tel: +81-(0)48-462-1225
email: pr@riken.jp
About RIKEN
RIKEN is Japan’s flagship research institute devoted to basic and
applied research. Over 2500 papers by RIKEN researchers are published every year in reputable scientific and technical journals, covering topics ranging across a broad spectrum of disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology, medical science and engineering. RIKEN’s advanced research environment and strong emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration has earned itself an unparalleled reputation for scientific excellence in Japan and around the world.

Website: www.riken.jp/en/ Find us on Twitter at @riken_en

About the Center for Developmental Biology

The RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology (CDB) was launched in April 2000 to advance research in the fields of animal development and regeneration and contribute to areas of clinical medicine that can benefit from such research. The CDB is dedicated to developing a better understanding of fundamental processes of animal development at the molecular and cell biological level, the more complex phenomena involved in organogenesis as well as the biology of stem cells and regeneration. By elucidating these processes researchers working at CDB hope to improve the effectiveness of regenerative medicine, for the benefit of society.

gro-pr | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.cdb.riken.jp/en/index.html

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Study relating to materials testing Detecting damages in non-magnetic steel through magnetism
23.07.2018 | Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

nachricht Innovative genetic tests for children with developmental disorders and epilepsy
11.07.2018 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

Im Focus: Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of a copper-oxide compound depends on the magnetic field in a very unusual way -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperatur

What happens when really powerful magnets--capable of producing magnetic fields nearly two million times stronger than Earth's--are applied to materials that...

Im Focus: World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

The quality of materials often depends on the manufacturing process. In casting and welding, for example, the rate at which melts solidify and the resulting microstructure of the alloy is important. With metallic foams as well, it depends on exactly how the foaming process takes place. To understand these processes fully requires fast sensing capability. The fastest 3D tomographic images to date have now been achieved at the BESSY II X-ray source operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

Dr. Francisco Garcia-Moreno and his team have designed a turntable that rotates ultra-stably about its axis at a constant rotational speed. This really depends...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone

14.08.2018 | Information Technology

During HIV infection, antibody can block B cells from fighting pathogens

14.08.2018 | Life Sciences

First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments

14.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>