Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pan-European study on “Smart Engineering”

30.03.2017

The EU wants to help European SMEs to catch up with smart industry. To provide specific support, the EU has initiated a pan-European survey on “Smart Engineering”. The research project’s objective is to identify the actual situation of European companies on their way towards Industry 4.0, to sum up all national funding initiatives and to determine the actual demand of SMEs. The project is jointly conducted by 15 research institutions and companies from seven countries – among them the Institut für Integrierte Produktion Hannover (IPH).

Smart engineering and networked systems revolutionize production industry. Machines learn how to intercommunicate and autonomously keep supplies coming, as soon as parts run low. Automated guided vehicles transport parts from the warehouse to the machine or they transport finished products to the shipping department. In modern factories, data is collected around the clock. With systematic data evaluation, companies can for example reduce maintenance costs and improve the quality of their products.


Keep Europe competitive – this is the reason why the EU supports small and medium-sized enterprises on their way to smart industry.

Photo credit: CC0 Public Domain

Small and medium-sized enterprises can also benefit from these developments. However, “the majority of SME managers is neither really aware of the basic developments and state-of-the-art of smart industry, nor do they have an idea how to deal with this issue professionally in their own company” – the tenor of an EU working paper on smart engineering.

“Other competitive markets, such as North America or Eastern Asia, seem to be much better prepared which should give Europe reason to worry.” Though many countries have already developed strategies to support countries on their way towards Industry 4.0, national activities mostly fail to provide opportunities for knowledge transfer and mutual learning. For this reason, the benefit for small and medium-sized companies remains limited.

To support the competitiveness of European SMEs, the European Union has initiated the research project “SMeART”. 15 research institutions and companies from seven countries are involved – among them the University of Applied Sciences for SMEs (FHM) and the Institut für Integrierte Produktion Hannover (IPH).

Within the scope of the pan-European study, researchers will assess the status quo to get an overview of all funding initiatives of the 28 member states and to create a funding map in six languages (English, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch and Slovenian). The map will show which regions are still in need of specific funding programmes.

Furthermore, the researchers will develop a stress test tool, giving small and medium-sized enterprises a means to find out their individual situation, i.e. how far they have already come on their way towards smart engineering and where they lag behind their competitors. In pilot projects, researchers will support selected companies in taking their next steps – for example when introducing new technologies.

Based on the research results, the European Union’s aim is to provide specific support to small and medium-sized enterprises to promote their transfer to smart industry – thus making them stay competitive compared to their international competitors. The research project “SMeART” is funded by the EU with about one million euros. The abbreviation stands for “Knowledge Alliance for Upskilling Europe’s SMEs to meet the challenges of Smart Engineering”. The project duration ends in December 2019.

For further information, please refer to http://www.smeart.iph-hannover.de

Susann Reichert | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Integrierte Produktion SMEs Smart knowledge transfer new technologies

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht TU Dresden biologists examine sperm quality on the basis of their metabolism
29.11.2019 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
27.11.2019 | Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing a digital twin

University of Texas and MIT researchers create virtual UAVs that can predict vehicle health, enable autonomous decision-making

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages, maybe even people, from location...

Im Focus: The coldest reaction

With ultracold chemistry, researchers get a first look at exactly what happens during a chemical reaction

The coldest chemical reaction in the known universe took place in what appears to be a chaotic mess of lasers. The appearance deceives: Deep within that...

Im Focus: How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue

Abnormal scarring is a serious threat resulting in non-healing chronic wounds or fibrosis. Scars form when fibroblasts, a type of cell of connective tissue, reach wounded skin and deposit plugs of extracellular matrix. Until today, the question about the exact anatomical origin of these fibroblasts has not been answered. In order to find potential ways of influencing the scarring process, the team of Dr. Yuval Rinkevich, Group Leader for Regenerative Biology at the Institute of Lung Biology and Disease at Helmholtz Zentrum München, aimed to finally find an answer. As it was already known that all scars derive from a fibroblast lineage expressing the Engrailed-1 gene - a lineage not only present in skin, but also in fascia - the researchers intentionally tried to understand whether or not fascia might be the origin of fibroblasts.

Fibroblasts kit - ready to heal wounds

Im Focus: McMaster researcher warns plastic pollution in Great Lakes growing concern to ecosystem

Research from a leading international expert on the health of the Great Lakes suggests that the growing intensity and scale of pollution from plastics poses serious risks to human health and will continue to have profound consequences on the ecosystem.

In an article published this month in the Journal of Waste Resources and Recycling, Gail Krantzberg, a professor in the Booth School of Engineering Practice...

Im Focus: Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Prototype microscope teaches itself the best illumination settings for diagnosing malaria

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The Future of Work

03.12.2019 | Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Solving the mystery of carbon on ocean floor

06.12.2019 | Earth Sciences

Chip-based optical sensor detects cancer biomarker in urine

06.12.2019 | Life Sciences

A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics

06.12.2019 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>