Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Long-term outcomes in patients with advanced coronary artery disease are better than expected

16.05.2013
Death rates associated with patients with refractory angina, or chronic chest pain, are lower than previously considered; therefore, physicians should focus on relieving the chest pain symptoms and improving the quality of life in these patients according to an article published online this week in the European Heart Journal.

Refractory angina patients endure ongoing chest pain despite optimal medical management and for them, standard revascularization techniques, such as surgery or stenting, is no longer an option. Traditionally, these are the patients with the most advanced coronary artery disease, frequently referred to as "no-option patients."

"Importantly, this study describes the first long-term results from the largest and most contemporary follow-up of patients in a dedicated refractory angina clinic," says the study's first author Timothy D. Henry, MD, director of research at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation. "Our results demonstrate that long-term mortality in patients with refractory angina is surprisingly low, below 4 percent per year."

The OPtions In Myocardial Ischemic Syndrome Therapy (OPTIMIST) program at the Minneapolis Heart Institute® at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis was created for refractory angina patients in 1996 to develop new treatment options for this challenging patient population. This study reflects the long-term survival and predictors of mortality.

The study population consisted of 1,200 consecutive patients with either refractory myocardial ischemia and/or refractory angina, who were not candidates for traditional revascularization and referred for alternative treatment strategies from 1996 to present.

Overall, 241 patients of the 1,200 died during a median follow-up of 5.1 years. After an analysis, the researchers determined mortality was 3.9 percent at one year and 28.4 percent at nine years.

"Currently, data on the incidence and prevalence of refractory angina are scarce and mainly derived from registries," explains Henry.

In addition to the low overall mortality, the results indicated non-cardiac death in nearly 30 percent of patients and a low incidence of sudden cardiac death.

Improved secondary prevention strategies, evidence-based medical therapy and more advanced revascularization techniques all likely contributed to lower mortality, concluded Henry and his colleagues in the paper.

"Widespread and improved adherence to medical medications combined with aggressive lifestyle changes, such as diet, exercise and smoking cessation, has contributed to lower overall mortality in patients with coronary artery disease, and this includes the highest-risk patients with refractory angina," Henry notes.

Based on the findings, more than 70 percent of patients with refractory angina can expect to survive nine years from the time of diagnosis. Given these results, the researchers emphasized that therapeutic options for this growing population should therefore focus on chest pain relief and improved quality of life.

Jon Holden DeHaan Foundation supported the study.
Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation
The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is dedicated to creating a world without heart disease through groundbreaking clinical research and innovative education programs. MHIF's mission is to promote and improve cardiovascular health, quality of life and longevity for all.

Minneapolis Heart Institute®

The Minneapolis Heart Institute® is recognized internationally as one of the world's leading providers of heart and vascular care. This state-of-the-art facility combines the finest in personalized patient care with sophisticated technology in a unique, family-oriented environment. The Institute's programs, a number of which are conducted in conjunction with Abbott Northwestern Hospital, address the full range of heart and vascular health needs: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

Contact Information:
Steve Goodyear
Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation
sgoodyear@mhif.org
612-863-1658

Steve Goodyear | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mhif.org
http://mplsheart.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip
12.11.2018 | Princeton University, Engineering School

nachricht Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices
06.11.2018 | Elsevier

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>