Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Infants should sleep in their own beds to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome

15.02.2016

The advice given to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, SIDS, has worked well, but the potential to save more lives exists. In addition to sleeping on their backs, infants should sleep in their own beds for the first few months to reduce the risk of sudden infant death. A new doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg has explored these issues.

In the early 1990s, the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare went out with advice to new parents to reduce the number of children who die each year from SIDS. The advice stated that children sleep safest on their backs, that smoking during pregnancy is a risk factor, that children should not be kept too warm, that they should be able to move freely and that breastfeeding provided a certain amount of protection.


Per Möllborg

Source: University of Gothenburg

Fewer deaths
The preventative advice led to a sharp drop in the number of deaths from SIDS; from over a hundred children annually, to about twenty deaths per year in more recent years.

Risk and preventative factors have changed when the cases are fewer and have not been studied recently. In a new thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy, the University of Gothenburg, Per Möllborg, Child Health Medical Officer, has studied the different factors surrounding SIDS to enable further preventative work.

"Infants should sleep in their own beds"
“The results show that more lives could potentially be saved if fewer babies slept on their stomachs or were placed on their sides, if fewer mothers smoked during pregnancy and if infants slept in their own beds in their parents’ bedroom during the first three months,” says Per Möllborg.

Children sleeping with their parents can be a risky situation during the first months. One of the thesis’ four studies examined co-sleeping. One out of five children slept with their parents at 6 months of age and it was even more common if the child was breastfed, had difficulty sleeping and woke often as well as if the mother was a single parent. If the child used a pacifier, co-sleeping was less common.

Current advice
The thesis shows that current advice is relatively well followed, and that only one in 20 infants are laid down to sleep on their stomachs. Babies were more commonly sleeping on their stomachs if the mother was unemployed, smoked during pregnancy, if the child was irritable, shared a room with siblings or did not use a pacifier.

“This knowledge gives the Child Health Centers the opportunity to more precisely focus information and further reduce the number of babies placed on their stomachs,” says Per Möllborg.

Lowered average age
One of the studies in the thesis showed that the risk of SIDS was greater if the parents did not live together, if the mother was young, had given birth to many children or if the baby was premature.

As sudden infant death syndrome has become less common, smoking has become a greater risk factor. Now, it is no longer more common for deaths during the winter months and the average age of sudden infant death has lowered from just under 3 months to 2 months, since introduction of the new advice in the early 1990s.

Link to thesis: https://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/41249

Contact:
Per Möllborg, Director and Child Health Medical Officer at Närhälsan, Region Fyrbodal, and PhD Candidate at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg. E-mail: per.mollborg@vregion.se

Weitere Informationen:

http://sahlgrenska.gu.se/english/research/news-article/?languageId=100001&co...

Calle Björned | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Researchers simplify tiny structures' construction drip by drip
12.11.2018 | Princeton University, Engineering School

nachricht Mandibular movement monitoring may help improve oral sleep apnea devices
06.11.2018 | Elsevier

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Researchers find social cultures in chimpanzees

20.11.2018 | Life Sciences

When AI and optoelectronics meet: Researchers take control of light properties

20.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>