Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Complex sex life of goats could have implications for wildlife management

15.12.2011
A new study of the mating habits of mountain goats reveals the vastly different strategies of males in different populations and could shed light on the unseen impacts of hunting.

A Durham University-led research team found that male chamois (a species of wild goat-antelope) adopt different strategies in different populations in order to succeed in the rut: some put a lot of energy in at a young age, while others wait until they are much older.

Researchers looking at neighbouring populations of chamois in Northern Italy found that males in one population delay their reproductive efforts until an older age when their size and experience allow them to dominate in the rut. They then put increasing effort into breeding until they die.

The study is the first to show clearly that this strategy of 'terminal investment', a pattern of higher reproductive effort in older age, is pursued by males in an animal population. The results, published in the journal PLoS One, show that reproductive strategies in animals are complex and can show surprising variation across neighbouring districts.

It's not clear why there is such variation but the way that these populations are managed through hunting could be a factor, according to the researchers. At present, 32 per cent of the hunting quota is made up of older males, even though these males make up only 23 per cent of the population.

If too many larger, older males are taken out of a population, younger males may be able to muscle in and start breeding. Years of rutting could exhaust these younger males, meaning that they are in poorer condition when they reach old age. If this reasoning is accurate, selectively hunting older males in populations such as this will have the effect of reducing the condition of older males in future.

This suggests that alternative hunting practices – such as hunting males in proportion to their age distribution – might be a better strategy.

Studies of bighorn sheep, a similarly hunted mountain species in America, have also suggested that selective hunting of older males can reduce genetic quality.

Researchers looked at three populations in detail and found that in neighbouring areas surprisingly different strategies prevailed; in one, the terminal investment strategy was dominant, in another, where older males were harvested at a slightly higher rate, the live fast/die younger strategy prevailed.

The group, led by Drs Stephen Willis and Philip Stephens, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, in collaboration with ecologists at the University of Sassari, Italy, used data from 15,000 hunted male chamois, collected since 1973, to explore their breeding strategies. They looked at the amount of energy males of different ages expended during the annual rut at several sites in the Italian Alps and found unexpected variation across populations.

Co-author Dr Stephen Willis said: "It seems that chamois can have fun in their youth or enjoy their old age but they can't do both. In one valley, males left it until much later to get involved in the rut but, once involved, they showed a pattern of increasing effort, right up to the end of their lives."

The team was able to see how much energy was expended by rutting chamois by looking at how the body masses of males changed throughout the rut period. They were also able to establish the ages of shot individuals from the number of annual growth rings in their horns. The speed at which the animals lose body mass shows how much effort males put in to establishing and patrolling territories, and fighting to defend their harem.

At a site with more hunting and a 'faster' pace of life, the team found that male weight loss during the rut was high, that chamois began rutting at an earlier age and that life-expectancy was lower. By contrast, at a site with a 'slower' pace, lifespans were longer, the weight loss of males was less and males tended to increase the effort they put into reproduction as they got older.

Male chamois barely eat during the rut and use their non-rutting time for resting rather than foraging. They must put on weight prior to the rut in order to succeed and to survive the following winter months.

Co-author of the study, Tom Mason, a Durham University PhD student working on the project, said: "In most species, all males follow one or other of these strategies. It is intriguing that among chamois in different areas, males have different strategies, which might be related to resources, climate or competition."

Dr Philip Stephens added: "These patterns are consistent with two competing theories about how males should optimally allocate effort to reproduction during their lives, so you wouldn't normally expect to see them being displayed so differently by males in neighbouring populations of the same species."

The study is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Carl Stiansen | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.durham.ac.uk

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Drought hits rivers first and more strongly than agriculture
06.09.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie

nachricht Landslides triggered by human activity on the rise
23.08.2018 | European Geosciences Union

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Goodbye, silicon? On the way to new electronic materials with metal-organic networks

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz (Germany) together with scientists from Dresden, Leipzig, Sofia (Bulgaria) and Madrid (Spain) have now developed and characterized a novel, metal-organic material which displays electrical properties mimicking those of highly crystalline silicon. The material which can easily be fabricated at room temperature could serve as a replacement for expensive conventional inorganic materials used in optoelectronics.

Silicon, a so called semiconductor, is currently widely employed for the development of components such as solar cells, LEDs or computer chips. High purity...

Im Focus: Storage & Transport of highly volatile Gases made safer & cheaper by the use of “Kinetic Trapping"

Augsburg chemists present a new technology for compressing, storing and transporting highly volatile gases in porous frameworks/New prospects for gas-powered vehicles

Storage of highly volatile gases has always been a major technological challenge, not least for use in the automotive sector, for, for example, methane or...

Im Focus: Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

When we put water in a freezer, water molecules crystallize and form ice. This change from one phase of matter to another is called a phase transition. While this transition, and countless others that occur in nature, typically takes place at the same fixed conditions, such as the freezing point, one can ask how it can be influenced in a controlled way.

We are all familiar with such control of the freezing transition, as it is an essential ingredient in the art of making a sorbet or a slushy. To make a cold...

Im Focus: Micro energy harvesters for the Internet of Things

Fraunhofer IWS Dresden scientists print electronic layers with polymer ink

Thin organic layers provide machines and equipment with new functions. They enable, for example, tiny energy recuperators. In future, these will be installed...

Im Focus: Dynamik einzelner Proteine

Neue Messmethode erlaubt es Forschenden, die Bewegung von Molekülen lange und genau zu verfolgen

Das Zusammenspiel aus Struktur und Dynamik bestimmt die Funktion von Proteinen, den molekularen Werkzeugen der Zelle. Durch Fortschritte in der...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Conference to pave the way for new therapies

17.10.2018 | Event News

Berlin5GWeek: Private industrial networks and temporary 5G connectivity islands

16.10.2018 | Event News

5th International Conference on Cellular Materials (CellMAT), Scientific Programme online

02.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nanocages in the lab and in the computer: how DNA-based dendrimers transport nanoparticles

19.10.2018 | Life Sciences

Thin films from Braunschweig on the way to Mercury

19.10.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

App-App-Hooray! - Innovative Kits for AR Applications

19.10.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>