Professor’s involvement in asthma jab which could save lives

Xolair, which blocks the allergic triggers behind 80 per cent of attacks, has been approved for NHS use by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Trials have shown the drug can halve the risks of asthma attacks and experts have hailed it a ‘wonder treatment’.

It is the first asthma injection that has been genetically engineered to block IgE – the immunoglobulin responsible for the allergic process which can lead to attacks. The new drug stops the body overreacting to inhaled allergic particles such as tree and grass pollens, cat fur and house-dust mites. Fortnightly or monthly injections have been shown to cut the risk of attacks in those with severe asthma by 55 per cent and reduce hospital admissions by half.

There are 5 million people in Britain with asthma, costing the economy and health service around £8 billion a year. The condition kills more than 1,400 people annually and a further 69,000 are put in hospital, in many cases for weeks.

Professor Britton comments: “Xolair is a breakthrough, the most important advance in asthma treatment for a decade. We can now prescribe Xolair for those severe allergic asthmatics, who are in and out of hospital with significant exacerbations. Our experience with the drug has shown that it has a dramatic effect on the quality of life for this group of unfortunate patients.”

Media enquiries: Peter La, Press Office at the University of Surrey, Tel: 01483 689191 or E-mail: p.la@surrey.ac.uk

Media Contact

Stuart Miller alfa

More Information:

http://www.surrey.ac.uk

All latest news from the category: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

Enhancing the workhorse

Artificial intelligence, hardware innovations boost confocal microscope’s performance. Since artificial intelligence pioneer Marvin Minsky patented the principle of confocal microscopy in 1957, it has become the workhorse standard in life…

In the quantum realm, not even time flows as you might expect

New study shows the boundary between time moving forward and backward may blur in quantum mechanics. A team of physicists at the Universities of Bristol, Vienna, the Balearic Islands and…

Hubble Spots a Swift Stellar Jet in Running Man Nebula

A jet from a newly formed star flares into the shining depths of reflection nebula NGC 1977 in this Hubble image. The jet (the orange object at the bottom center…

Partners & Sponsors