Malaria – breakthrough in understanding the side effects of mefloquine

Two British scientists, Dr Ashley Croft and Dr Andrew Herxheimer, have published a paper which for the first time tries to explain the adverse effects of the controversial antimalaria drug, mefloquine (Lariam®).

Mefloquine, made by the Swiss drug company Hoffmann-La Roche, is used both to treat and prevent malaria. Since the 1980s doctors have used it to treat around 2 million people with malaria, and about 15 million travellers have used mefloquine as malaria prophylaxis.

Although many mefloquine users tolerate the drug well, in others it can cause a wide range of neuropsychiatric and other disturbing side effects, including hallucinations, nightmares, anxiety, tremor and psychosis. The first randomised controlled trial of mefloquine use in general travellers was published late last year in Clinical Infectious Diseases. One-third of the travellers using mefloquine reported neuropsychiatric adverse effects, and 6% of all mefloquine users reported at least one adverse event serious enough to require medical advice.

Media Contact

Andrew Herxheimer alphagalileo

All latest news from the category: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

A world-first antibody-drug delivery system

It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: a man-made crystal that can be attached to antibodies and then supercharge them with potent drugs or imaging agents that can seek…

Revealed: How SARS-CoV-2 evades our immune system

Scientists at Hokkaido University and Texas A&M University have identified a key mechanism used by the SARS-CoV-2 virus to evade host immune systems. Researchers in Japan and the United States…

New approach developed to predict response of immunotherapies in lung cancer

New methodology at the University Hospital of Tübingen harnesses the function of platelets. At Tübingen University Hospital, a preclinical study led by Dr. Clemens Hinterleitner and Prof. Dr. Lars Zender,…

Partners & Sponsors