New treatment model for HIV

This tradeoff has led to the development of various drug-sparing HIV-1 treatment strategies, which often results in the emergence of resistant viruses and overall treatment failure. This has prompted an interest in induction–maintenance (IM) treatment strategies, in which brief intensive therapy is used to reduce host viral levels, which is then followed by a simplified and more easily tolerated maintenance regimen.

IM approaches remain an unproven concept in HIV therapy. In a study publishing July 13, 2007 in PLoS Computational Biology, clinical responses to antiretroviral drug therapy are simulated for the first time, and the model is then applied to IM therapy. Marcel Curlin, Shyamala Iyer, and John Mittler, from the University of Washington, find that IM is expected to be successful beyond three years and that six to ten months of induction therapy should achieve durable suppression of HIV and maximize the possibility of eradicating viruses resistant to the maintenance regime. They also find the counter-intuitive result that for induction regimens of limited duration the optimal time to initiate induction therapy may be several days or weeks after the start of regular (maintenance) therapy.

These results are important not simply because they show how this particular, albeit important, therapy strategy may be optimized, but because they illustrate the more general potential for mathematical models to influence therapy decisions. “Our experience has been that clinicians and policy makers are often hesitant to consider, sometimes even hostile towards, mathematical modeling approaches. Instead, they rely on intuition or await the results of expensive, long-term clinical trials”, says Mittler. By presenting a detailed model that makes concrete quantitative predictions and gives some interesting, counter-intuitive qualitative results, this paper may help to change attitudes concerning the value of dynamical modeling approaches.

PLEASE ADD THIS LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://compbiol.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pcbi.0030133 (link will go live on July 13th)

CITATION: Curlin ME, Iyer S, Mittler JE (2007) Optimal timing and duration of induction therapy for HIV-1 Infection. PLoS Comput Biol 3(7): e133. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.0030133

CONTACT:
John Mittler
Department of Microbiology,
University of Washington,
Seattle,
Washington,
United States of America
jmittler@u.washington.edu

Media Contact

Andrew Hyde alfa

More Information:

http://www.ploscompbiol.org

All latest news from the category: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

New species of microalgae discovered

Ultrasmall microalgae found in home aquarium could have multiple useful applications. A new species of microalgae was found in water from a home aquarium. While analyzing DNA samples taken from…

New technology may help inform brain stimulation

Brain stimulation, such as Deep brain stimulation (DBS), is a powerful way to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. While it has provided therapeutic benefit for sufferers of Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and…

New hybrid catalyst could help decarbonization

… and make ethylene production more sustainable. A new hybrid catalyst converts carbon dioxide into ethylene in one pot. The catalyst was developed by scientists from Ames National Laboratory, Iowa…

Partners & Sponsors