Student designs home screening kit for MRSA super bug

An innovative idea from a Northumbria University student could stop the deadly MRSA superbug in its tracks.


Final year Design for Industry student Sarah Clark has invented a home screening kit to test for the bug before admission to hospital.

Sarah hit on the idea after discovering that one third of the British population carries the MRSA bug in their noses.

The device is a simple two-pronged plastic instrument that is simply inserted into the nose to allow a swab to be taken. The sample would then be sent to the hospital for analysis.

Sarah, 22 of Leatherhead, Surrey, said: “The Department of Health has already said that they don’t want to have to screen all patients because of the impact this would have on waiting lists. However a home screening kit would allow easy detection of MRSA carriers prior to hospital admission.’

She added: “It’s all about empowering the NHS in the fight against the MRSA saving lives and an estimated £1 billion a year.’

Before hitting on the idea she did a lot of research in the hospital environment. She plans to approach the NHS about her idea very soon.

The home screening kit is on display along with other exhibits from the Design for Industry show in Room 209, Squires Building, Northumbria University, until 28 June.

All the exhibits will then be taken to the New Designers exhibition in London which runs from 6 – 10 July.

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