Calculate Heart Attack Risk

What’s your risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the next 10 years?


The August issue of Mayo Clinic Women’s HealthSource tells how you can calculate it and why it’s important.

Heart disease is the leading killer of women in the United States, and about 85 percent of women with coronary heart disease have at least one main risk factor — smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol or hypertension. Because many risk factors are either preventable or treatable, learning about them and taking action can lower the risk of heart attack or stroke.

And the risks add up. A 65-year-old woman with one risk factor has a 2 percent chance of heart attack in 10 years. With four risk factors, the risk is 17 percent.

You can calculate your risk by using the 10-year risk calculator developed by the National Cholesterol Education Program. By plugging your numbers into the formula found on the Web at http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp, you can come up with important information to safeguard your health.

Mayo Clinic Women’s HealthSource is published monthly to help women enjoy healthier, more productive lives. Revenue from subscriptions is used to support medical research at Mayo Clinic. To subscribe, please call 800-876-8633, extension 9PK1.

Media Contact

newswise

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.mayo.edu

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

How Stable is the Antarctic Ice Sheet?

Scientists from Heidelberg University investigate which factors determine the stability of ice masses in East Antarctica. As temperatures rise due to climate change, the melting of polar ice sheets is…

Smart sensors for future fast charging batteries

European project “Spartacus” launched Faster charging, longer stability of performance not only for electric vehicles but also for smartphones and other battery powered products. What still sounds like science fiction…

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics

Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most…

Partners

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close