Yale researcher discovers "brain temperature tunnel"

Yale researcher M. Marc Abreu, M.D., has identified an area of the brain he calls the brain temperature tunnel, which transmits brain temperature to an area of skin and has the potential to prevent death from heat stroke and hypothermia, and detect infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

Abreu, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Ophthalmology at Yale School of Medicine, found that a small area of skin near the eyes and the nose is the point of entry for the brain temperature tunnel. His research shows that this area is connected to a thermal storage center in the brain, and the area has the thinnest skin and the highest amount of light energy. He has constructed patches and eyeglasses designed to continuously measure brain temperature at this entry point.

Unlike other vital signs like heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory rate, which can be monitored continuously, core body temperature measurement cannot be currently measured continuously and non-invasively.

“With the discovery of the brain temperature tunnel, sunglasses and eyeglasses will serve not only visual function, but also functions that sustain and enhance human life and performance,” said Abreu.

Abreu said this discovery could impact a host of health issues such as athletic performance and training, enhancing safety and performance of athletes, firefighters, members of the military and outdoor recreationists. Abreu said the discovery could also help protect the world food supply and improve food safety by continuous monitoring of infectious diseases in animals such as foot-and-mouth disease, bovine tuberculosis, anthrax and mad cow disease.

For those who are sick at home and in hospitals, Abreu said this discovery could also provide continuous temperature monitoring without the need for nurse intervention. “One of the most important causes of death is hospital infection, which kills more than 100,000 patients a year in the United States,” said Abreu. “The inability to detect temperature changes in a timely fashion can lead to spread of infection and even cause death. Monitoring the brain temperature tunnel can detect infection early, so timely therapy can be administered and complications prevented.”

Abreu said, “The brain temperature tunnel has enabled the creation of systems that enhance performance while maximizing safety in hot or cold temperatures and preventing dehydration or overhydration.”

Abreu explains that when athletes, military personnel, construction workers and firefighters die from heat stroke, it is because the brain temperature rises rapidly to dangerous levels and lack of timely detection and intervention causes brain damage. He further explains that physical performance is decreased because the blood is used for cooling the body. The high temperature in the brain can also lead to thermal induced injury and impaired cognitive function.

“Monitoring brain temperature will also enable women to use a natural method for tracking fertility and birth control,” said Abreu. “Automated detection of ovulation can also enhance programs for artificial insemination in animals on dairy farms and in zoos.”

Media Contact

Karen N. Peart EurekAlert!

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.yale.edu

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Cyanobacteria: Small Candidates …

… as Great Hopes for Medicine and Biotechnology In the coming years, scientists at the Chair of Technical Biochemistry at TU Dresden will work on the genomic investigation of previously…

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional…

Big-hearted corvids

Social life as a driving factor of birds’ generosity. Ravens, crows, magpies and their relatives are known for their exceptional intelligence, which allows them to solve complex problems, use tools…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close