Mayo Clinic researchers document safer treatment for atrial fibrillation

Mayo Clinic researchers report that the risk of stroke that sometimes results from a common treatment for atrial fibrillation can be minimized when the patient takes anticoagulation medication prior to the procedure.

The researchers report on the largest single medical center experience regarding safety of elective direct current (DC) cardioversion of atrial fibrillation. DC cardioversion is the electronic restoration of the heart’s normal rhythm.

Atrial fibrillation affects more than 2.5 million people in the United States. It is characterized by an irregular and rapid beating of the heart’s atrial chambers and results when the normal electrical conduction system of the atria is not functioning properly. It is estimated that atrial fibrillation is responsible for more than 70,000 strokes each year in the United States. The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with age.

The researchers found that the rate of stroke or other embolic happenings — clots or blockages of the blood vessels — occurring in a patient after cardioversion was less than 1 percent. In the study, 834 successful cardioversions were performed in 717 patients from 1990 through 1994. Researchers said that use of adequate anticoagulation medication prior to the procedure reduced the risk of thromboembolism.

Mayo Clinic researchers involved in the study were Federico Gentile, M.D.; Bijoy Khanderia, M.D.; James Seward, M.D.; Christine Lohse, BSc; Win-Kuang Shen, M.D.; Kent Bailey, Ph.D.; Samantha Montgomery, MSc; Belli Burger, BSc and A. Jamil Tajik, M.D. Abdou Elhendy, M.D., Ph.D. is now with the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

Warren Manning, M.D., and Peter Zimetbaum, M.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, write in an accompanying editorial that clinicians must assess the individual patient to determine the benefits of cardioversion.

“If the decision favors cardioversion, (the researchers) have provided further proof of the efficacy of three to four weeks of warfarin anticoagulation before cardioversion,” the editorialists write about the current approach to treatment.

Additional contact information:
John Murphy
507-284-5005 (days)
507-284-2511 (evenings)
e-mail: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Media Contact

John Murphy EurekAlert!

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

How Stable is the Antarctic Ice Sheet?

Scientists from Heidelberg University investigate which factors determine the stability of ice masses in East Antarctica. As temperatures rise due to climate change, the melting of polar ice sheets is…

Smart sensors for future fast charging batteries

European project “Spartacus” launched Faster charging, longer stability of performance not only for electric vehicles but also for smartphones and other battery powered products. What still sounds like science fiction…

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics

Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most…

Partners

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close