Home life prevents exercise in workers

People are more likely to keep to their plans to exercise on non-work days than on work days. However, it is worry over one’s personal life rather than work-related worries that prevents people keeping to their plans. This is the finding of a study reported today, Thursday 5 September 2002, at the British Psychological Society Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, Sheffield Hallam University, by psychologists Nicola Payne, Fiona Jones, and Peter Harris of Sheffield Hallam University.

In the study 42 employees completed a questionnaire each evening for two weeks that measured their intention to exercise the following day. The frequency of actual exercise was measured. Job demands and work and non-work related anxiety and depression were also measured. As expected, the study authors found that on work days people were less likely than on non-work days to keep to their plans to exercise. But this finding could not be explained by such things as how demanding was the work or by worries about work.

Instead the researchers found that people were less likely to exercise on days when anxiety and depression related to personal issues was higher, people were less likely to exercise. The authors discuss their findings in the context of helping people stick to a healthy lifestyle

Media Contact

Ann Macaskill AlphaGalileo

All latest news from the category: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

Creating good friction: Pitt engineers aim to make floors less slippery

Swanson School collaborators Kurt Beschorner and Tevis Jacobs will use a NIOSH award to measure floor-surface topography and create a predictive model of friction. Friction is the resistance to motion…

Synthetic tissue can repair hearts, muscles, and vocal cords

Scientists from McGill University develop new biomaterial for wound repair. Combining knowledge of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering, scientists from McGill University develop a biomaterial tough enough to repair the…

Constraining quantum measurement

The quantum world and our everyday world are very different places. In a publication that appeared as the “Editor’s Suggestion” in Physical Review A this week, UvA physicists Jasper van…

Partners & Sponsors