Tapah downgrades to a depression

Aqua captured this image of the tropical depression Tapah on April 29, 2014, at 11:55 p.m. EDT (3:55 UTC) in the western Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA Goddard's MODIS Rapid Response Team

Tapah rapidly dissipated due to the effected of strong vertical windshear from the west and a sharp decreased in sea surface temperature.

The storm is currently tracking northwest at 10 knots per hour and is expected to recurve to the northeast and accelerate.

Maximum wave height is currently 10 feet. The storm will be monitored for signs of regeneration.

NASA captured this image of the storm with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on April 29, 2014 at 11:55 p.m. EDT (3:55 UTC) in the western Pacific Ocean.

Media Contact

Rob Gutro Eurek Alert!

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.nasa.gov

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

An artificial cell on a chip

Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a precisely controllable system for mimicking biochemical reaction cascades in cells. Using microfluidic technology, they produce miniature polymeric reaction containers equipped with…

Specific and rapid expansion of blood vessels

Nature Communications: KIT researchers identify a new mechanism to control endothelial cell size and arterial caliber – basis for better treatment of heart infarct and stroke. Upon a heart infarct…

Climate change drives plants to extinction in the Black Forest in Germany

Climate change is leaving its mark on the bog complexes of the German Black Forest. Due to rising temperatures and longer dry periods, two plant species have already gone extinct…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close