Connecting the San Andreas Fault through Southern California

A web of faults links the San Andreas Fault over a discontinuous 80-kilometer [50 mile] region in southern California. Carena et al. analyzed a gap in the famous fault line that runs from the Mojave Desert to the Coachella Valley and suggest that a network of seismically active faults likely connects the two strands of the 1,200-kilometer [750-mile] San Andreas Fault.

The researchers examined the three-dimensional geometry of the fault system in the complex region, reaching nearly 20 kilometers [10 miles] below the Earth’s surface. They report that the San Andreas devolves into a series of faults with varying configurations such that it would require an unlikely sequence of fault ruptures to trigger a massive earthquake involving both strands of the fault.

The authors also modeled several possible fault rupture scenarios for earthquakes in the Los Angeles area to determine the likelihood of a complex rupture.

Title: Lack of continuity of the San Andreas Fault in southern California: Three-dimensional fault models and earthquake scenarios

Media Contact

Sara Carena Journal of Geophysical Research

Further information:

http://www.agu.org

All news from this category: Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Back to the Homepage

Comments (0)

Write comment

Latest posts

Novel chirped pulses defy ‘conventional wisdom’

University of Rochester researchers describe first highly chirped pulses created by a using a spectral filter in a Kerr resonator. The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics was shared by researchers…

Scientists design superfast molecular motor

Light-driven molecular motors have been around for over twenty years. These motors typically take microseconds to nanoseconds for one revolution. Thomas Jansen, associate professor of physics at the University of…

Changing a 2D material’s symmetry can unlock its promise

Jian Shi Research Group engineers material into promising optoelectronic. Optoelectronic materials that are capable of converting the energy of light into electricity, and electricity into light, have promising applications as…

Partners & Sponsors