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Trucks will be a solid pillar of the transportation sector in the future

Anyone who can interpret present day traffic signs will be able to understand one thing: despite ongoing environmental debates and heated discussions regarding tolls, the truck will be a solid pillar of the European freight transportation system for years to come.

It is an accepted fact that a cost-effective transport system is a defining characteristic of a highly-developed, modern society. The responsible carrier, as well the manner in which goods are transported, is incidental. More important is having a rapid, cost-effective and safe transport system .

Heated discussions on the topic of truck tolls occur on a regular basis within Europe. As an observer of the debates, one almost has the impression that the array of traffic signs serves to undermine the respective arguments instead of regulating truck traffic . Even if the actual development of the transportation sector seems to contradict current environmental debates at first glance, experts still predict the truck will play a large and important role in the European goods transportation system into the future.

Truck tolls a stumbling block?

Even if the abundance of additional traffic signs positioned at toll stations suggests otherwise, toll fees do not prevent more trucks from hitting the roads. In truth, Europe is moving in a different direction. Whether additional toll fees are assessed or not, truck manufacturers are focusing more on safety, profitability and the environment.

Despite the use of traffic signs to route commercial truck traffic over toll roads, carriers can find ways to offset the additional costs incurred by rising toll fees. The reduction of fuel consumption in trucks is regarded as a secret formula to compensate for this situation. Hence, traffic signs do not always reflect an accurate picture of tolls and truck traffic. The industry will continue to question the wisdom of toll fees, toll regulations and toll stations , much like the truck toll system in and of itself.

Simultaneously, there are indications of a trend toward increasingly larger trucks within Europe. With this in mind, the question still remains as to whether or not the traffic signs designed to limit heavy goods traffic are simply disregarding the long-term development of the truck.

Too many traffic signs?

In parallel, heated debates are just now developing in many countries regarding the usefulness of many traffic signs. Traffic signs that were ambitiously installed over the years in an effort to regulatetruck traffic and truck toll systems, are now being questioned, traffic sign by traffic sign. Critics are going so far as to refer to a "traffic sign jungle", while zealously pointing to an inconsistently regulated toll system for trucks. The discussions revolving around traffic signs and truck tolls must leave average EU citizens shaking their heads. Nevertheless, these traffic signs and truck toll systems actually mask substantial economic interests.

Both traffic signs and truck tolls are designed to regulate traffic on European roads. Still, not every traffic sign makes sense and not every truck toll that is levied can be viewed objectively. The fact is, an excess of traffic signs can be found in inner cities, where one traffic sign after is installed. And many of these traffic signs appear to be superfluous.

Drivers often have the impression that the installed traffic signs confuse than regulate the traffic. A solution unfortunately does not appear to be on the horizon.

Transportation and Logistics

This field deals with all spatial and time-related activities involved in bridging the gap between goods and people, including their restructuring. This begins with the supplier and follows each stage of the operational value chain to product delivery and concludes with product disposal and recycling.

innovations-report provides informative reports and articles on such topics as traffic telematics, toll collection, traffic management systems, route planning, high-speed rail (Transrapid), traffic infrastructures, air safety, transport technologies, transport logistics, production logistics and mobility.

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Penn State simulation testing suggests that barriers, called underride guards, placed on the rear end of heavy trucks to prevent cars from sliding underneath and being crushed in rear-end collisions may be less effective if placed lower or higher than 16 inches (400 mm) from the ground. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration regulations set a maximum ground clearance of 22 inches (560 mm) and no minimum for underride guards on new trucks. The Penn State simulati 17.11.2003 | nachricht Read more

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From Darwin to Adelaide, the length of Australia, 3010 kilometres, without fuel!

On 19 October 30 cars will be jostling for position at the start of the 7th World Solar Challenge in Darwin, Australia. After winning in 2001 with Nuna I, the Nuon Solar Team, from the Netherlands, will be bidding to retain their title. The strong team of twelve from Delft University of Technology and Erasmus University Rotterdam are determined to beat the world record and try to average 100 km/h, compared to 91.81 km/h in 2001. Nuna II uses advanced space technology, provided to the team th 17.10.2003 | nachricht Read more

NASA research team successfully flies first laser-powered aircraft

Ever since the dawn of powered flight, it has been necessary for all aircraft to carry onboard fuel — whether in the form of batteries, fuel, solar cells, or even a human "engine" — in order to stay aloft. But a team of researchers from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, Calif., and the University of Alabama in Huntsville is trying to change that. They have now chalked up a major accomplishment… and a 10.10.2003 | nachricht Read more

Advanced Finnish technology for automotive wiring systems

Assisted by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PKC Group, Finland works to develop bus technology applications for use in the power distribution and control systems on commercial vehicles. The concept is to offer customers flexible intelligent features while reducing the amount of wiring. The new LIN (Local Interconnect Network) technology was recently deemed to be the most promising technology to fulfil vehicle manufacturers’ new technological specifications. To succeed in compe 24.09.2003 | nachricht Read more

Pay-as-you-go motoring just around the corner

Death and taxes may be unavoidable, but road tolls and car insurance could be made fairer if satellite-assisted distance pricing is implemented. The European Space Agency (ESA) is funding Irish provider of location technology products Mapflow to undertake a feasibility study to look into the possibility of implementing a pan-European road tolling system. The research aims to establish whether satellite technology can be used to calculate the cost of motoring. A plan exists to 09.09.2003 | nachricht Read more

Assessing and repairing roads and pavements

Repairing our roads when and where it is needed was the goal for EUREKA project GEOSECMA-PMS. The project team created a complete software ’’toolbox’’ for municipalities and road authorities to assist them in the maintenance of roads and streets, thereby providing a safer, more comfortable ride for the public and savings for local government. Hans-Goeran Wilhelmsson, chief executive of KORDAB, lead partner in the project, says the results have benefited citizens as well a 26.08.2003 | nachricht Read more
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