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Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Latest News:

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'Trojan horse' anticancer drug disguises itself as fat

Promising system delivers chemo drug straight into tumors with fewer side effects

A stealthy new drug-delivery system disguises chemotherapeutics as fat in order to outsmart, penetrate and destroy tumors.

18.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Ants that defend plants receive sugar and protein

The aggressiveness of ants in arid environments with scarce food supply helps protect plants against herbivorous arthropods

Biologists Laura Carolina Leal and Felipe Passos performed a series of experiments in Brazil's Northeast region - specifically in the interior of Bahia State,...

18.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Leukemia: how cancer stem cells suppress a danger detector

Acute myeloid leukemia stem cells elude the body’s immune cells by deactivating a danger detector. The underlying mechanisms and the potential new therapeutic approaches that this gives rise to have been detailed in the journal Nature by researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel in collaboration with colleagues in Germany.

Patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) often achieve remission but then later experience relapses due to surviving subpopulations of leukemia stem...

18.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

A study demonstrates that p38 protein regulates the formation of new blood vessels

A study performed at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in the journal Nature Communications demonstrates that inhibition of the p38 protein boosts the formation of blood vessels in human and mice colon cancers. Known as angiogenesis, this process is critical in fuelling cancer cells, allowing them to grow and to eventually develop metastases.

The team led by Ángel R. Nebreda, head of the Signalling and Cell Cycle Laboratory at IRB Barcelona, has shown that the activity of p38 is important in...

17.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

For bacteria, the neighbors co-determine which cell dies first: The physiology of survival

Bacteria do not simply perish in hunger phases fortuitously; rather, the surrounding cells have a say as well. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that two factors, above all, decide over life and death: the energy required to continue living and the efficiency with which surviving cells can recycle biomass from dead cells.

The survival and growth of cells are central factors in biological systems. Scientists such as Ulrich Gerland, Professor for Physics of Complex Biosystems at...

17.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Atacama Desert: Some lichens can meet their need for water from air humidity

The Atacama Desert in Chile is one of the most arid places on earth. To survive here, lichens use fog, dew and high humidity. For some of them, the high humidity alone is sufficient to carry out photosynthesis. This is at least the case with lichens, which sit on cacti. Their relatives on the ground are not able to accomplish this. This is the result of a study by researchers around Dr Patrick Jung from Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK), Germany, published on the online portal "MicrobiologyOpen". These lichens can therefore be active for a longer period of time. During their work in the Chilean desert, the researchers also discovered and described a new species of lichen.

The Atacama Desert extends in the east of South America on a high plateau along the Pacific coast. Water vapour regularly rises here on the steep rocky coasts....

17.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Megakaryocytes act as „bouncers“ restraining cell migration in the bone marrow

Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as “bouncers” and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the Journal “Haematologica”.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cells, which occurs predominantly in the bone marrow. The bone marrow produces all types of blood cells: red...

16.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

A human liver cell atlas

Scientists discover previously unknown subtypes of liver cells in health and disease

The liver is one of the largest and most versatile organs of the human body. It turns sugars, proteins, and fats from our food into substances useful for the...

15.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Possibilities of the biosimilar principle of learning are shown for a memristor-based neural network

A group of scientists from Russia and Greece opens up new prospects for using local learning rules based on memristors to solve artificial intelligence problems using complex spiking neural network architectures

Lobachevsky University scientists together with their colleagues from the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" (Moscow) and the National Research...

15.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Researchers reveal mechanisms for regulating temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decompos

The temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition, commonly referred to as Q10, is a key parameter in the terrestrial carbon cycle. It quantifies the increase in the rate of decomposition corresponding to a 10oC rise in temperature and can determine the sign and magnitude of terrestrial carbon-climate feedback.

The regulatory mechanisms involved in the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition has been a topic of great interest among the global change research...

15.07.2019 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.

Most soft robots are actuated by rigid, noisy pumps that push fluids into the machines' moving parts. Because they are connected to these bulky pumps by tubes,...

Im Focus: Vehicle Emissions: New sensor technology to improve air quality in cities

Researchers at TU Graz are working together with European partners on new possibilities of measuring vehicle emissions.

Today, air pollution is one of the biggest challenges facing European cities. As part of the Horizon 2020 research project CARES (City Air Remote Emission...

Im Focus: Self healing robots that "feel pain"

Over the next three years, researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, University of Cambridge, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-Paris) and Empa will be working together with the Dutch Polymer manufacturer SupraPolix on the next generation of robots: (soft) robots that ‘feel pain’ and heal themselves. The partners can count on 3 million Euro in support from the European Commission.

Soon robots will not only be found in factories and laboratories, but will be assisting us in our immediate environment. They will help us in the household, to...

Im Focus: Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick - the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

The researchers measured the thickness of the gold to be 0.47 nanometres - that is one million times thinner than a human finger nail. The material is regarded...

Im Focus: Study on attosecond timescale casts new light on electron dynamics in transition metals

An international team of scientists involving the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has unraveled the light-induced electron-localization dynamics in transition metals at the attosecond timescale. The team investigated for the first time the many-body electron dynamics in transition metals before thermalization sets in. Their work has now appeared in Nature Physics.

The researchers from ETH Zurich (Switzerland), the MPSD (Germany), the Center for Computational Sciences of University of Tsukuba (Japan) and the Center for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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