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Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Latest News:

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Slip layer dynamics reveal why some fluids flow faster than expected

New microscopy technique provides unprecedented insight into nanoscopic slip layers formed in flowing complex liquids

Whether it is oil gushing through pipelines or blood circulating through arteries, how liquids flow through tubes is perhaps the most fundamental problem in...

02.08.2019 | nachricht Read more

How plants synthesise salicylic acid

The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid, now sold as Aspirin, has been known for thousands of years. Besides being a useful drug with numerous health applications, it is a stress hormone made by plants which is essential in enabling them to fight off damaging pathogens. What was not known, however, is how plants generated this hormone. Now, an international research team led by the University of Göttingen with the University of British Columbia in Vancouver have at last unravelled the biosynthesis of this crucial hormone. Their results were published in Science.

As far back as Neanderthal times, bark containing salicylic acid was chewed to self-medicate; the first chemical extraction was in the 1820s, and an improved...

02.08.2019 | nachricht Read more

Using organisms to decontaminate soil

The German Ministry of Education and Research is funding a long-term soil remediation project run by the University of Jena. The project is to investigate and test biological methods for remediating soils contaminated with metal at the former uranium mining site near Ronneburg, Thuringia, to renew the soils, and to make them available for land use.

Decontaminating the legacy of uranium mining in the GDR

01.08.2019 | nachricht Read more

New protein-sensing mechanism discovered

In a stunning discovery, molecular biologists from the University of Konstanz and ETH Zurich have been able to demonstrate that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) senses newly synthesized proteins upon birth inside the ribosomal tunnel

New research published in Molecular Cell on 31 July 2019 conducted by researchers from the University of Konstanz’s Collaborative Research Centre 969 “Chemical...

01.08.2019 | nachricht Read more

Next-generation medication: where chemistry meets computation

A group of Japanese researchers mainly from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and Hokkaido University drastically enhanced and sped up the way to skeletally diverse indole alkaloids, composed of the medicinally-relevant scaffolds. By leveraging computational and synthetic approaches, this group has successfully developed a concise and versatile synthetic process generating the densely-functionalized multicyclic complex scaffolds, which would facilitate the development of both medicine and agrochemicals.

This synthetic approach employing zing (II) reagent in place of Hg(II) or Gold-based reagents are also environmentally friendly as well as much cheaper than...

31.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Poisonous grasses: new study provides reassurance

Stories of mass poisoning incidents of livestock due to toxic grasses made headlines especially overseas. Animal ecologists from Würzburg have studied whether this hazard is also lurking on German pastures.

"Dangerous Pastures: Deadly Grass Puts Horses at Risk" – Such dire warnings on the websites of horse owners and horse lovers may cause people to see their...

31.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Selective antibiotics following nature’s example

Chemists from Konstanz develop selective agents to combat infectious diseases – based on the structures of natural products

With multi-resistant germs becoming more and more of a threat, we are in need of new antibiotics now more than ever. Unfortunately, antibiotics cannot...

30.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Food profilers develop new methodological approach for food analysis: Better food quality control

Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future.

Whether a food tastes good or not is essentially determined by the interaction of odors and tastants. A few trillionths of a gram per kilogram of food is...

30.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Immortal Planarians: Better Stem Cells under Starvation

Planarians are very plastic animals. Due to a high number of stem cells, planarians are able to regenerate a new individual from a tiny fragment of their body. Researchers of the Leibniz Institute on Aging (FLI) in Jena, Germany together with colleagues of the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research in Madrid, Spain now investigated the planarian stem cell pool under conditions of starvation. Their results show that long telomeres are a major characteristic of adult stem cells in planarians. Starvation has a positive effect on the adult stem cell pool, as starved stem cells show a higher telomere length. The results are now published in the Journal Stem Cell Reports.

Planarians are very plastic animals. They are able to regenerate whole body parts; even from a tiny fragment of their body, they are able to regenerate a new...

29.07.2019 | nachricht Read more

Simpler than expected: A microbial community with reduced diversity cleans up after algal blooms

Algae blooms regularly make for pretty, swirly satellite photos of lakes and oceans. They also make the news occasionally for poisoning fish, people and other animals. What's less frequently discussed is the outsize role they play in global carbon cycling. A recent study now reveals surprising facts about carbon flow in phytoplankton blooms. Unexpectedly few bacterial clades with a restricted set of genes are responsible for a major part of the degradation of algal sugars.

Algae take up carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere and turn the carbon into biomass while releasing the oxygen back to the atmosphere. Fast algal growth...

29.07.2019 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Hamburg and Kiel researchers observe spontaneous occurrence of skyrmions in atomically thin cobalt films

Since their experimental discovery, magnetic skyrmions - tiny magnetic knots - have moved into the focus of research. Scientists from Hamburg and Kiel have now been able to show that individual magnetic skyrmions with a diameter of only a few nanometres can be stabilised in magnetic metal films even without an external magnetic field. They report on their discovery in the journal Nature Communications.

The existence of magnetic skyrmions as particle-like objects was predicted 30 years ago by theoretical physicists, but could only be proven experimentally in...

Im Focus: Physicists create world's smallest engine

Theoretical physicists at Trinity College Dublin are among an international collaboration that has built the world's smallest engine - which, as a single calcium ion, is approximately ten billion times smaller than a car engine.

Work performed by Professor John Goold's QuSys group in Trinity's School of Physics describes the science behind this tiny motor.

Im Focus: Quantum computers to become portable

Together with the University of Innsbruck, the ETH Zurich and Interactive Fully Electrical Vehicles SRL, Infineon Austria is researching specific questions on the commercial use of quantum computers. With new innovations in design and manufacturing, the partners from universities and industry want to develop affordable components for quantum computers.

Ion traps have proven to be a very successful technology for the control and manipulation of quantum particles. Today, they form the heart of the first...

Im Focus: Towards an 'orrery' for quantum gauge theory

Experimental progress towards engineering quantized gauge fields coupled to ultracold matter promises a versatile platform to tackle problems ranging from condensed-matter to high-energy physics

The interaction between fields and matter is a recurring theme throughout physics. Classical cases such as the trajectories of one celestial body moving in the...

Im Focus: A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.

Most soft robots are actuated by rigid, noisy pumps that push fluids into the machines' moving parts. Because they are connected to these bulky pumps by tubes,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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