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Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

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Bacterial influencers -- rhizosphere microbiome mediates root metabolite exudation

Roots are plant organs, that typically absorb water and minerals from soil. It is lesser known that roots also secrete metabolites, so-called root exudates, which impact the properties of soil directly around the root. This thin layer of soil is called the rhizosphere and is home to a rich microbial diversity, the root microbiota.

By producing certain exudates, plants communicate with and govern the microbial life within their rhizosphere for their own benefit. Now, researchers have...

10.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Minimally-invasive hydrogen therapy of cancer based on in-vivo electrochemistry

Up to now, cancer is still one of the major diseases that threaten the survival of mankind, and it is difficult to cure clinically. In addition to single or combined surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which are commonly used clinically, a number of promising therapeutic strategies have been recently put forward including immunotherapy and gene therapy, photothermal therapy (PTT), photodynamic therapy, and so on.

However, these techniques usually rely on chemical and genetic drugs or exotic nanomaterials to actualize treatments, making them quite difficult or debatable...

10.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Evolution of Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV) and modeling of spike protein for human transmission

The cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan City, Hubei Province of China was first reported on December 30, 2019 by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) later determined and announced a novel coronavirus (CoV), denoted as Wuhan CoV (2019-nCoV), had caused the outbreak of the pneumonia.

The current public health emergency partially resembles the emergence of the SARS outbreak in southern China in 2002, which led to more than 8,000 human...

10.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Scientists discover how rogue communications between cells lead to Leukaemia

How do biochemical messengers mediate the development of new blood cells and how do these processes get out of control in leukaemias? An international research team involving partners from Germany, United Kingdom, Finland and the USA has achieved a fundamental breakthrough in understanding the mechanism of these processes. The results of this research project were published on February 7th 2020 in the new issue of the renowned journal "Science" (https://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.aaw3242).

In adults, billions of mature blood cells are formed from haematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow every day. This process is tightly regulated by a family...

10.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Inner “clockwork” sets the time for cell division in bacteria

Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered a “clockwork” mechanism that controls cell division in bacteria. In two publications, in “Nature Communications” und “PNAS”, they report how a small signaling molecule starts the “clock”, which informs the cell about the right time to reproduce.

The ability of pathogens to multiply in the host is crucial for the spread of infections. The speed of bacterial division greatly depends on the environmental...

10.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Breakthrough in research into age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the commonest cause of blindness in developed countries, affecting some 1.5 million people in the UK alone. Treatment options are limited, so whilst neovascular (“wet”) AMD is to some extent treatable, there is no available treatment for the other form, called geographic atrophy or late “dry” AMD. A role for inflammation has been posited for at least twenty years and the finding from genetic evidence that an inherited fault in a protein called factor H (FH) was a strong risk factor for AMD focused attention on a part of the immune system called the complement system, a key driver of inflammation that FH helps to control.

The suggestion that AMD was caused by a failure of complement regulation in the eye has catalysed a rush to develop drugs that inhibit complement to treat...

07.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

UCLA research could be step toward lab-grown eggs and sperm to treat infertility

A new study on how and when the precursors to eggs and sperm are formed during development could help pave the way for generating egg and sperm cells in the lab to treat infertility.

The study, published in the journal Cell Reports, describes the way in which human stem cells evolve into germ cells, the precursors for egg and sperm cells.

07.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Fighting Against Multi-Resistant Bacteria

Many bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antibiotics. In their search for new therapeutic strategies, Würzburg research groups employ modern digital technologies. The Free State of Bavaria provides millions for this purpose.

Developing fundamentally new approaches against multi-resistant germs: This is the goal of the new Bavarian research network bayresq.net. The Free State of...

07.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Recognise and control new variants of the deadly Ebola virus more quickly

JOINT PRESS RELEASE BY THE DZIF AND CHARITÉ

People in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are still battling with an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus which has been ongoing since 2018 and has already...

06.02.2020 | nachricht Read more

Programmed vascular endothelium remodeling using a remote-controlled 'smart' platform

According to the statistics from World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease has become the leading cause of death worldwide, inducing almost 1/3 of death each year. Owing to its importance and promise in cardiovascular disease treatment, vascular regeneration has attracted global attentions in both academic and clinic.

Within the vascular regeneration process, endothelium remodeling, which refers to the formation of a confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer on the...

06.02.2020 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A step towards controlling spin-dependent petahertz electronics by material defects

The operational speed of semiconductors in various electronic and optoelectronic devices is limited to several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second). This constrains the upper limit of the operational speed of computing. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay have explained how these processes can be sped up through the use of light waves and defected solid materials.

Light waves perform several hundred trillion oscillations per second. Hence, it is natural to envision employing light oscillations to drive the electronic...

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

Im Focus: Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

Investigation of the temperature dependence of the skyrmion Hall effect reveals further insights into possible new data storage devices

The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated...

Im Focus: Making the internet more energy efficient through systemic optimization

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently completed a 5-year research project looking at how to make fibre optic communications systems more energy efficient. Among their proposals are smart, error-correcting data chip circuits, which they refined to be 10 times less energy consumptive. The project has yielded several scientific articles, in publications including Nature Communications.

Streaming films and music, scrolling through social media, and using cloud-based storage services are everyday activities now.

Im Focus: New synthesis methods enhance 3D chemical space for drug discovery

After helping develop a new approach for organic synthesis -- carbon-hydrogen functionalization -- scientists at Emory University are now showing how this approach may apply to drug discovery. Nature Catalysis published their most recent work -- a streamlined process for making a three-dimensional scaffold of keen interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

"Our tools open up whole new chemical space for potential drug targets," says Huw Davies, Emory professor of organic chemistry and senior author of the paper.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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