Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Latest News:

Page anfang | 2365 | 2366 | 2367 | 2368 | 2369 | ende

Researchers identify decision-making area of the brain

New research from investigators in the Centre for Neuroscience Studies at Queen’s University and the Centre for Brain and Mind at The University of Western Ontario has provided the first neuro-imaging evidence that the brain’s frontal lobes play a critical role in planning and choosing actions. Their study is published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience. The research team has found that a small region in the frontal lobe of the human brain is selectively activated when 05.11.2002 | nachricht Read more

Researchers study first-ever soybean harvest from International Space Station

Like farmers across the nation bringing in their crops this season, researchers in Wisconsin are carefully taking stock of a very special harvest – one grown aboard the International Space Station. They’ve measured and weighed plants, counted seeds, and collected additional physical information from the first-ever soybean crop grown aboard the orbiting research laboratory. Now, the research team will begin several months of chemical and biological tests on the plants that w 04.11.2002 | nachricht Read more

The brain gets the big picture

When you look at a picture, your brain has to put together lines, patterns and shapes to make a meaningful scene. New research by neuroscientists at the University of California, Davis and the University of Minnesota shows that higher regions of the brain can quickly recognize patterns and shapes and tell lower areas of the brain to stop processing the information. The finding confirms predictions from computer models and helps explain how the human brain makes sense of what the eyes see. S 01.11.2002 | nachricht Read more

Global warming has uneven effect on coastal animals

Although it is expected that populations of many organisms will move away from the equator and toward the poles to stay cool during global warming, researchers have found that the intertidal zone does not exactly fit this pattern. A study published in this week’s Science Magazine indicates that there may be "hot spots" at northern shoreline sites within the next three to five years. This is partly due to the timing of the tides. "Because they are assumed to live very close to their thermal 01.11.2002 | nachricht Read more

USC scientists uncover secrets of feather formation

’Jurassic Chicken’ project may help studies of human development and evolution of dinosaurs Scientists from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California have, for the first time, shown experimentally the steps in the origin and development of feathers, using the techniques of molecular biology. Their findings will have implications for the study of the morphogenesis of various epithelial organs-from hairs to lung tissue to mammary glands-and is already sheddin 31.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

UT Southwestern scientist helps identify neurons in worms that control link between stress, eating

Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and the University of California, San Francisco have shown that feeding behavior in worms is controlled by neurons that detect adverse or stressful conditions. The findings are published in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature. The discovery of the gene that controls social feeding behavior in worms was made in 1998 by researchers at UCSF. The new findings build on the earlier research by identifying the nociceptive neurons – ne 31.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

’Ping-Pong’ mechanism seen in gene-controlling enzyme

An enzyme that plays a pivotal role in controlling genes in yeast acts through a more versatile mechanism than was previously thought to be the case, according to a new study by researchers at The Wistar Institute. Its mode of action is also distinct from that of other members of the vital enzyme family into which it falls, the scientists found. Because the human counterpart of the enzyme has been associated with certain forms of leukemia, this observation raises the possibility that 30.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Evolution: fish select for the survival of the fittest

An important breakthrough has been made in determining the forces responsible for the evolution of populations in nature. By studying wild populations of grayling (a close relative of salmon), Mikko Koskinen and Craig Primmer at the University of Helsinki and Thrond Haugen at the University of Oslo found that natural selection, a force suggested by Charles Darwin in `The Origin of Species`, was responsible for up-to 90% of grayling evolution. In their study, published in Nature on October 24 30.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Chemist shoots chemistry ’in the act’

A physical chemist at Washington University in St. Louis is combining powerful lasers with clever timing schemes to characterize how chemical reactions occur with very precise atomic and time resolution. Understanding the mechanisms and physics of a chemical reaction at the most fundamental level could provide valuable insights into new directions for the field of chemistry. Richard A. Loomis, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry, is a physical chemist building on the femtochemistry adv 30.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Transforming brain research with jellyfish genes and advances in microscopy

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are transplanting jellyfish genes into mice to watch how neural connections change in the brains of entire living animals. The development represents the merging of several technologies and enable researchers to watch changes inside living animals during normal development and during disease progression in a relatively non-invasive way. "This work represents a new approach to studying the biology of whole, living animals, 30.10.2002 | nachricht Read more
Page anfang | 2365 | 2366 | 2367 | 2368 | 2369 | ende

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms

Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone. The scientists will publish the results shortly in the journal Nano Letters.

In the electronics and computer industry, components are becoming ever smaller and more powerful. However, there are problems with the heat generation. It is...

Im Focus: First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure

Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices.

Physicists from the University of Warwick and the University of Washington have developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in...

Im Focus: Megakaryocytes act as „bouncers“ restraining cell migration in the bone marrow

Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as “bouncers” and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the Journal “Haematologica”.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cells, which occurs predominantly in the bone marrow. The bone marrow produces all types of blood cells: red...

Im Focus: Artificial neural network resolves puzzles from condensed matter physics: Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking...

Im Focus: Extremely hard yet metallically conductive: Bayreuth researchers develop novel material with high-tech prospects

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bayreuth has produced a previously unknown material: Rhenium nitride pernitride. Thanks to combining properties that were previously considered incompatible, it looks set to become highly attractive for technological applications. Indeed, it is a super-hard metallic conductor that can withstand extremely high pressures like a diamond. A process now developed in Bayreuth opens up the possibility of producing rhenium nitride pernitride and other technologically interesting materials in sufficiently large quantity for their properties characterisation. The new findings are presented in "Nature Communications".

The possibility of finding a compound that was metallically conductive, super-hard, and ultra-incompressible was long considered unlikely in science. It was...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on UV LED Technologies & Applications – ICULTA 2020 | Call for Abstracts

24.06.2019 | Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Heat flow through single molecules detected

19.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Heat transport through single molecules

19.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Welcome Committee for Comets

19.07.2019 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>