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Between atmosphere and stratosphere: interdisciplinary research is gaining momentum

One of today's most pressing research challenges, which has huge significance for future generations, is the impact of the human overcivilization of the atmosphere and stratosphere. The survival of the blue planet will depend on how research deals with this conflict.

Researchers warn that the atmosphere and stratosphere are striking back.

Solar radiation and vapor content in the atmosphere and stratosphere determine the climate and the weather. The natural greenhouse effect created by carbon dioxide is a long-term cyclic process that has had a regulative function with respect to the geological development of the earth. Thegreenhouse gases in the atmosphere and stratosphere , which have drastically increased over the last 100 years, is a homemade problem. Research on the atmosphere and stratosphere leads scientists to believe this development will result in a dramatic climate change by accelerating the on-going process. Damage to the earth's ozone layer in the stratosphere further aggravates the situation according to researchers. The atmosphere and stratosphere are taking the brunt of the effects of human overcivilization. Researchers sum it up by suggesting that in turn, mankind is paying the price for what is does to the atmosphere and stratosphere.

The earth's atmosphere - as critical as the air we breathe

The atmosphere, a gaseous shell that envelops the earth's surface, consists of several layers. The atmosphere equates to a gas mixture made chiefly of oxygen and nitrogen and is normally referred to as air. Argon, neon, helium, krypton and xenon are present in small quantities, in addition to trace gases and aerosols in in varying quantities. When the earth was created around 4.56 billion years ago, oxygen played no role in the atmosphere and stratosphere. Over the course of the chemical evolution, it first made life on earth possible roughly 350 million years ago.

Can research control the looming menace?

Hardly any other branch of scientific research has gained more momentum over the past decades than research into the causes of climate events in the atmosphere and stratosphere . Findings raise the hope that mankind will contemplate and rethink the issue and eventually develop effective instruments to combat the growing danger to the atmosphere and stratosphere. Parallel to global efforts, researchers are striving to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through targeted measures that can stem climate change, and this has a direct impact on discussions surrounding the atmosphere and stratosphere.

How will mankind deal with the technological innovations created through research , which would be experienced very differently on a regional basis? Are humans willing to protect the atmosphere and stratosphere by investing in future technologies that won't be effective until further generations? How much will humans be willing to accept when it comes to research into the atmosphere and stratosphere?

The atmosphere and stratosphere will remain the focus of interdisciplinary research

Against the backdrop of a world that is politically and economically linked, discussions regarding the atmosphere and stratosphere have a global dimension. The research issues related to changes in the atmosphere and stratosphere have long been more than just scientific. What would a society look like in which the atmosphere and stratosphere are progressing toward conditions that make life on earth unsustainable or at least where vital aspects of the environment are seriously impacted? How far is the human species willing to transform itself and how quickly can man and science develop measures to tackle changes to the atmosphere and stratosphere?

Research will be tasked with laying the foundation for humans with the will to change.

Interdisciplinary Research

News and developments from the field of interdisciplinary research.

Among other topics, you can find stimulating reports and articles related to microsystems, emotions research, futures research and stratospheric research.

Latest News:

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The Vinland Map shows its true colors; scientists say it’s a confirmed forgery

For the first time in the controversial saga of the famous Vinland Map, scientists say they have shown with certainty that the supposed relic is actually a 20th-century forgery. The findings are reported in the July 31 print issue of Analytical Chemistry, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. The Vinland Map -- a drawing that suggests Norse explorers charted North America long before Columbus -- has given scientists and historians 29.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Scientists Create New Material With Varying Densities of Gold Nanoparticles

Material could be used to make better filters, more efficient sensors, and faster catalysts For the first time, scientists have created a material with a gradient of gold nanoparticles on a silica covered silicon surface using a molecular template. The material, which was developed at North Carolina State University (NCSU) and tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National 19.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

ACE inhibitor drug used to delay heart failure as effective in blacks as whites

A drug widely used to treat patients with heart failure is as effective for black patients as it is for white patients, according to researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. The results of this analysis do not support the hypothesis that black patients with heart failure may not respond as well to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors as white patients with heart failure, said Dr. Daniel Dries, lead author of the study in today’s issue of the Journal of the Americ 19.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

MIT technique could improve cartilage repair

MIT engineers are excited about a new technique for repairing cartilage that could have significant advantages over the procedure now commonly used. This could affect people disabled by osteoarthritis, which slowly destroys the tissue that cushions joints. Hundreds of thousands others damage cartilage through sports-related injuries and other accidents. The new technique involves growing cartilage cells within a novel "designer" gel outside the body, then ultimately delivering the cell-seede 18.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Blue tits love the smell of perfumed nests!

French birds love the smell of perfumed nests. In an article published this month in Ecology Letters, scientists from the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique report that a small cavity-nesting bird on the island of Corsica, the blue tit, adorns its nests with fragments of strongly perfumed plants, including lavender and mint. The chemical compounds of these plants are economically important as they are used for aromatic house cleaners and herbal medicines. The researchers also discovered that t 12.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

To deter a predator, kill its young!

Prey have evolved a suite of tricks to avoid falling victim to a predator. They may escape, hide, protect, become toxic/inedible or defend themselves. In principle, they could also scare the predator away, but this is risky when predators are big. Recent work led by a Dutch research team and published in the July issue of Ecology Letters revealed that a plant-feeding thrips insect overcomes this differential size problem by killing the eggs of its enemy, a plant-inhabiting predatory mite. Th 12.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Can the sphinx keep its feet dry?

The monuments of ancient Egypt may have stood for thousands of years in the desert sands, but now they face a new threat -- from rising groundwater. Ayman Ahmed of the University of Sohag, Egypt, is working with Graham Fogg, professor of hydrology at the University of California, Davis, to study the problem and find ways to solve it. Preliminary findings by Ahmed and Fogg indicate that farming, urbanization and residential housing near the temples are causing water tables to rise. 03.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Product-emotion-meter helps in product design

Choosing a product is largely an emotional process. The subject of Pieter Desmet’s research project was to try to unravel this relationship between product and emotion. Along with his research, he also developed a Product-Emotion meter (PrEmo) with which emotions towards a product can be measured. Desmet will defend his thesis on Tuesday 25 June at TU Delft. Emotions can, for example, lead us to drive a certain car or use a certain brand of toothpaste. Producers and developers of products 21.06.2002 | nachricht Read more

Studies of spider’s silk reveal unusual strength

University of California, Santa Barbara scientists and U.S. Army researchers are making progress in the study of spider dragline silk, according to recently published proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The protein that lets spiders drop and helps the web to catch prey is what interests the researchers. The molecules are designed to be pulled; they are elastic and very strong. The silk can be extended 30 to 50 percent of its length before it breaks. It is stronger than steel a 18.06.2002 | nachricht Read more

Researchers send in thousands of new ideas for European research

Universities, companies and research centres have sent more than 15,000 ideas for European research projects to the European Commission. More than 100,000 groups and institutions were involved in drafting the ideas; the proposed teams involve potentially several hundreds of thousands of researchers across Europe and beyond. In a radical departure from previous programmes and for the first time, on March 20, 2002, the Commission asked the scientific community to say what they see as the most promising 12.06.2002 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Biotechnology: Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme

In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics. Researchers now identified an enzyme that, when illuminated with blue light, becomes catalytically active and initiates a reaction that was previously unknown in enzymatics. The study was published in "Nature Communications".

Enzymes: they are the central drivers for biochemical metabolic processes in every living cell, enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very...

Im Focus: New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

Early detection of tumors is extremely important in treating cancer. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from...

Im Focus: I-call - When microimplants communicate with each other / Innovation driver digitization - "Smart Health“

Microelectronics as a key technology enables numerous innovations in the field of intelligent medical technology. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT coordinates the BMBF cooperative project "I-call" realizing the first electronic system for ultrasound-based, safe and interference-resistant data transmission between implants in the human body.

When microelectronic systems are used for medical applications, they have to meet high requirements in terms of biocompatibility, reliability, energy...

Im Focus: When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality

Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. Only one year later, an international team led by Italian researchers was able to synthesize these materials and experimentally prove their topological properties. For the renowned journal Nature Materials, this was the occasion to invite Thomas Heine to a News and Views article, which was published this week. Under the title "Making 2D Topological Polymers a reality" Prof. Heine describes how his theory became a reality.

Ultrathin materials are extremely interesting as building blocks for next generation nano electronic devices, as it is much easier to make circuits and other...

Im Focus: Rolling into the deep

Scientists took a leukocyte as the blueprint and developed a microrobot that has the size, shape and moving capabilities of a white blood cell. Simulating a blood vessel in a laboratory setting, they succeeded in magnetically navigating the ball-shaped microroller through this dynamic and dense environment. The drug-delivery vehicle withstood the simulated blood flow, pushing the developments in targeted drug delivery a step further: inside the body, there is no better access route to all tissues and organs than the circulatory system. A robot that could actually travel through this finely woven web would revolutionize the minimally-invasive treatment of illnesses.

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart invented a tiny microrobot that resembles a white blood cell...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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