Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

HomeScience ReportsReports and NewsInterdisciplinary Research

Between atmosphere and stratosphere: interdisciplinary research is gaining momentum

One of today's most pressing research challenges, which has huge significance for future generations, is the impact of the human overcivilization of the atmosphere and stratosphere. The survival of the blue planet will depend on how research deals with this conflict.

Researchers warn that the atmosphere and stratosphere are striking back.

Solar radiation and vapor content in the atmosphere and stratosphere determine the climate and the weather. The natural greenhouse effect created by carbon dioxide is a long-term cyclic process that has had a regulative function with respect to the geological development of the earth. Thegreenhouse gases in the atmosphere and stratosphere , which have drastically increased over the last 100 years, is a homemade problem. Research on the atmosphere and stratosphere leads scientists to believe this development will result in a dramatic climate change by accelerating the on-going process. Damage to the earth's ozone layer in the stratosphere further aggravates the situation according to researchers. The atmosphere and stratosphere are taking the brunt of the effects of human overcivilization. Researchers sum it up by suggesting that in turn, mankind is paying the price for what is does to the atmosphere and stratosphere.

The earth's atmosphere - as critical as the air we breathe

The atmosphere, a gaseous shell that envelops the earth's surface, consists of several layers. The atmosphere equates to a gas mixture made chiefly of oxygen and nitrogen and is normally referred to as air. Argon, neon, helium, krypton and xenon are present in small quantities, in addition to trace gases and aerosols in in varying quantities. When the earth was created around 4.56 billion years ago, oxygen played no role in the atmosphere and stratosphere. Over the course of the chemical evolution, it first made life on earth possible roughly 350 million years ago.

Can research control the looming menace?

Hardly any other branch of scientific research has gained more momentum over the past decades than research into the causes of climate events in the atmosphere and stratosphere . Findings raise the hope that mankind will contemplate and rethink the issue and eventually develop effective instruments to combat the growing danger to the atmosphere and stratosphere. Parallel to global efforts, researchers are striving to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through targeted measures that can stem climate change, and this has a direct impact on discussions surrounding the atmosphere and stratosphere.

How will mankind deal with the technological innovations created through research , which would be experienced very differently on a regional basis? Are humans willing to protect the atmosphere and stratosphere by investing in future technologies that won't be effective until further generations? How much will humans be willing to accept when it comes to research into the atmosphere and stratosphere?

The atmosphere and stratosphere will remain the focus of interdisciplinary research

Against the backdrop of a world that is politically and economically linked, discussions regarding the atmosphere and stratosphere have a global dimension. The research issues related to changes in the atmosphere and stratosphere have long been more than just scientific. What would a society look like in which the atmosphere and stratosphere are progressing toward conditions that make life on earth unsustainable or at least where vital aspects of the environment are seriously impacted? How far is the human species willing to transform itself and how quickly can man and science develop measures to tackle changes to the atmosphere and stratosphere?

Research will be tasked with laying the foundation for humans with the will to change.

Interdisciplinary Research

News and developments from the field of interdisciplinary research.

Among other topics, you can find stimulating reports and articles related to microsystems, emotions research, futures research and stratospheric research.

Latest News:

Page anfang | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | ende

Researchers in Finland working on a comprehensive model of the carbon cycle

Researchers in Finland are working to develop a comprehensive, multidisciplinary model of the carbon cycle and its impacts on climate change in northern ecosystems. The focus of work in the Academy of Finland’s Global Change Research Programme (FIGARE) has been on the uptake and release of carbon in different ecosystem reservoirs, the atmosphere, vegetation, trees, forest land and lakes. ‘The carbon dioxide content in the earth’s atmosphere is slowly and steadily increasing. Given the resul 08.11.2002 | nachricht Read more

Protein folding physics modeled at the atomic level

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California, San Diego, have created the first computer simulation of full-system protein folding thermodynamics at the atomic-level. Understanding the basic physics of protein folding could solve one of the grand mysteries of computational biology. Proteins are the basic building blocks of life and protein folding, the process by which proteins reconfigure themselves - the actions that result in structural change - are the 16.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Overlapping genetic and archaeological evidence suggests neolithic migration

For the first time, Stanford researchers have compared genetic patterns with archeological findings to discover that genetics can help predict with a high degree of accuracy the presence of certain artifacts. And they say the strength of this link adds credence to theories that prehistoric people migrated from the Middle East to Europe, taking both their ideas and their way of life with them. "The recovery of history is really a jigsaw puzzle," said Peter Underhill, PhD, senior research sci 11.09.2002 | nachricht Read more

New simulation shows 9/11 plane crash with scientific detail

Engineers, computer scientists and graphics technology experts at Purdue University have created the first publicly available simulation that uses scientific principles to study in detail what theoretically happened when the Boeing 757 crashed into the Pentagon last Sept. 11. Researchers said the simulation could be used as a tool for designing critical buildings – such as hospitals and fire stations – to withstand terrorist attacks. The simulation merges a realistic-looking visual 11.09.2002 | nachricht Read more

New Stem Cell Program : Funds Awarded to Nervous System Projects and Stem Cell Bank Networks

Nine projects and two extensive networks will share 44 million Swedish kronor (SEK) in research funds, the first grants awarded by Sweden’s new Joint Program on Stem Cell Research. Of nearly 50 applicants, 11 received grants. Several of the funded projects address the nervous system. Diabetes is another area to receive funding. - The entire stem cell field is on the threshold of development. These grants are extremely important for advancing research so that we can identify areas with the greatest po 06.09.2002 | nachricht Read more

The discovery of the oldest human ancestor is (again) called into question

Analyses of the similar bones to the fossils lead a leading physiologist to term the anthropological finding as ’farfetched speculation’ The remains included a jawbone with teeth, hand bones and foot bones, fragments of arms, and a piece of collarbone. The remains also included a single toe bone; its form providing strong evidence that the pre-human creatures walked upright. The discovery by two Ethiopian scholars, Yohannes Haile-Selassie, an anthropologist studyin 27.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

Researchers establish link between cold climates, poor housing and high blood pressure

People living in the north and west of Britain in poor quality housing are at a significantly greater risk of high blood pressure than those living in warmer climates, and better quality housing, say scientists today. The research, published recently in the International Journal of Epidemiology, shows how scientists from Imperial College London, the University of Edinburgh and University College London identified an `inverse housing law` in Britain, whereby people in colder climates such as 21.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

Scientists use alfalfa plants to harvest nanoparticles of gold

Ordinary alfalfa plants are being used as miniature gold factories that one day could provide the nanotechnology industry with a continuous harvest of gold nanoparticles. An international research team from the University of Texas-El Paso (UTEP) and Mexico advanced the work at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) - part of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in Menlo Park, Calif. The researchers are using, as tiny factories, the alfalfa’s natural, physiological 15.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

The mathematics of a clean swimming pool

Without adequate cleaning regimes swimming pools can become a health hazard. Now water experts and mathematicians are ‘pooling’ their expertise to anticipate the factors that lead to an unhealthy swimming environment. The researchers are testing different water treatments using a unique pilot pool, donated by an advisory body, that simulates the chemical environment of a municipal swimming pool. Significantly this research technique could also be applied to other water recycling systems, 31.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Scientists determine age of first New World map

Parchment points to authenticity of Vinland Map For the first time, scientists have ascribed a date – 1434 A.D., plus or minus 11 years – to the parchment of the controversial Vinland Map, possibly the first map of the North American continent. Collaborators from the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education (SCMRE), Suitland, Md., the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, N.Y., used carbon-dating techn 30.07.2002 | nachricht Read more
Page anfang | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | ende

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Biotechnology: Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme

In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics. Researchers now identified an enzyme that, when illuminated with blue light, becomes catalytically active and initiates a reaction that was previously unknown in enzymatics. The study was published in "Nature Communications".

Enzymes: they are the central drivers for biochemical metabolic processes in every living cell, enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very...

Im Focus: New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

Early detection of tumors is extremely important in treating cancer. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from...

Im Focus: I-call - When microimplants communicate with each other / Innovation driver digitization - "Smart Health“

Microelectronics as a key technology enables numerous innovations in the field of intelligent medical technology. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT coordinates the BMBF cooperative project "I-call" realizing the first electronic system for ultrasound-based, safe and interference-resistant data transmission between implants in the human body.

When microelectronic systems are used for medical applications, they have to meet high requirements in terms of biocompatibility, reliability, energy...

Im Focus: When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality

Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. Only one year later, an international team led by Italian researchers was able to synthesize these materials and experimentally prove their topological properties. For the renowned journal Nature Materials, this was the occasion to invite Thomas Heine to a News and Views article, which was published this week. Under the title "Making 2D Topological Polymers a reality" Prof. Heine describes how his theory became a reality.

Ultrathin materials are extremely interesting as building blocks for next generation nano electronic devices, as it is much easier to make circuits and other...

Im Focus: Rolling into the deep

Scientists took a leukocyte as the blueprint and developed a microrobot that has the size, shape and moving capabilities of a white blood cell. Simulating a blood vessel in a laboratory setting, they succeeded in magnetically navigating the ball-shaped microroller through this dynamic and dense environment. The drug-delivery vehicle withstood the simulated blood flow, pushing the developments in targeted drug delivery a step further: inside the body, there is no better access route to all tissues and organs than the circulatory system. A robot that could actually travel through this finely woven web would revolutionize the minimally-invasive treatment of illnesses.

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart invented a tiny microrobot that resembles a white blood cell...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Black nitrogen: Bayreuth researchers discover new high-pressure material and solve a puzzle of the periodic table

29.05.2020 | Materials Sciences

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles

29.05.2020 | Materials Sciences

Smart windows that self-illuminate on rainy days

29.05.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>