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Between atmosphere and stratosphere: interdisciplinary research is gaining momentum

One of today's most pressing research challenges, which has huge significance for future generations, is the impact of the human overcivilization of the atmosphere and stratosphere. The survival of the blue planet will depend on how research deals with this conflict.

Researchers warn that the atmosphere and stratosphere are striking back.

Solar radiation and vapor content in the atmosphere and stratosphere determine the climate and the weather. The natural greenhouse effect created by carbon dioxide is a long-term cyclic process that has had a regulative function with respect to the geological development of the earth. Thegreenhouse gases in the atmosphere and stratosphere , which have drastically increased over the last 100 years, is a homemade problem. Research on the atmosphere and stratosphere leads scientists to believe this development will result in a dramatic climate change by accelerating the on-going process. Damage to the earth's ozone layer in the stratosphere further aggravates the situation according to researchers. The atmosphere and stratosphere are taking the brunt of the effects of human overcivilization. Researchers sum it up by suggesting that in turn, mankind is paying the price for what is does to the atmosphere and stratosphere.

The earth's atmosphere - as critical as the air we breathe

The atmosphere, a gaseous shell that envelops the earth's surface, consists of several layers. The atmosphere equates to a gas mixture made chiefly of oxygen and nitrogen and is normally referred to as air. Argon, neon, helium, krypton and xenon are present in small quantities, in addition to trace gases and aerosols in in varying quantities. When the earth was created around 4.56 billion years ago, oxygen played no role in the atmosphere and stratosphere. Over the course of the chemical evolution, it first made life on earth possible roughly 350 million years ago.

Can research control the looming menace?

Hardly any other branch of scientific research has gained more momentum over the past decades than research into the causes of climate events in the atmosphere and stratosphere . Findings raise the hope that mankind will contemplate and rethink the issue and eventually develop effective instruments to combat the growing danger to the atmosphere and stratosphere. Parallel to global efforts, researchers are striving to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through targeted measures that can stem climate change, and this has a direct impact on discussions surrounding the atmosphere and stratosphere.

How will mankind deal with the technological innovations created through research , which would be experienced very differently on a regional basis? Are humans willing to protect the atmosphere and stratosphere by investing in future technologies that won't be effective until further generations? How much will humans be willing to accept when it comes to research into the atmosphere and stratosphere?

The atmosphere and stratosphere will remain the focus of interdisciplinary research

Against the backdrop of a world that is politically and economically linked, discussions regarding the atmosphere and stratosphere have a global dimension. The research issues related to changes in the atmosphere and stratosphere have long been more than just scientific. What would a society look like in which the atmosphere and stratosphere are progressing toward conditions that make life on earth unsustainable or at least where vital aspects of the environment are seriously impacted? How far is the human species willing to transform itself and how quickly can man and science develop measures to tackle changes to the atmosphere and stratosphere?

Research will be tasked with laying the foundation for humans with the will to change.

Interdisciplinary Research

News and developments from the field of interdisciplinary research.

Among other topics, you can find stimulating reports and articles related to microsystems, emotions research, futures research and stratospheric research.

Latest News:

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Scientists develop new tool for imprinting biochips

The new technology could allow researchers to fit more biochemical probes onto a single biochip and reduce the cost of screening and analyzing changes associated with disease development, detecting bioterrorism agents, and other areas of research

3-D printing has gained popularity in recent years as a means for creating a variety of functional products, from tools to clothing and medical devices. Now,...

09.03.2018 | nachricht Read more

Combating sulphuric acid corrosion at wastewater plants: Graz scientists develop new solution

Writing in Water Research, Austrian researchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz discuss new materials that prevent damage from microbial induced concrete corrosion.

Wastewater systems are integral to infrastructure in every community. In an ideal world, they operate smoothly and are long-lasting. But biogenic...

23.02.2018 | nachricht Read more

Stealth Virus for Cancer Therapy

Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells.

Viruses have their own genetic material and can infect human cells in a very specific manner. They will then reproduce as directed by their own genes but using...

31.01.2018 | nachricht Read more

New formulas for exploring the age structure of non-linear dynamical systems

Mathematical models about how mass moves in natural systems are used in various scientific fields such as to understand the global carbon and water cycles, or predicting the spread of contaminants or tracers in water bodies, soils, or organisms. These models, technically known as compartmental systems, are common in medical sciences, biology, and geosciences. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena made a big step forward in this field by developing formulas and algorithms that help to describe the evolution of the age of particles in such systems when these are out of equilibrium.

Their findings, just published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), extend the existing theory that so far was...

23.01.2018 | nachricht Read more

Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems

How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team under the supervision of the University of Bonn is now presenting an innovative method on mice: Muscle replacement cells, which are to take over the function of the damaged tissue, are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. These cells are then injected into the damaged heart muscle and held in place by a magnet, causing the cells to engraft better onto the existing tissue. The scientists show that this leads to a significant improvement in heart function. The journal "Biomaterials" presents the results in advance online, the print version will be published in the future.

In a heart attack, clots usually lead to persistent circulatory problems in parts of the heart muscle, which then cause heart muscle cells to die. Attempts...

04.12.2017 | nachricht Read more

Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

01.12.2017 | nachricht Read more

Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

07.11.2017 | nachricht Read more

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has uncovered a direct link between sample quality and the degree of valley polarization in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). In contrast with graphene, many monolayer TMDs are semiconductors and show promise for future applications in electronic and optoelectronic technologies.

In this sense, a 'valley' refers to the region in an electronic band structure where both electrons and holes are localized, and 'valley polarization' refers...

20.10.2017 | nachricht Read more

Integrated lab-on-a-chip uses smartphone to quickly detect multiple pathogens

Findings published in Analytical Chemistry and BioMedical Devices

A multidisciplinary group that includes the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma has developed a novel...

19.10.2017 | nachricht Read more

Scientists develop machine-learning method to predict the behavior of molecules

An international, interdisciplinary research team of scientists has come up with a machine-learning method that predicts molecular behavior, a breakthrough that can aid in the development of pharmaceuticals and the design of new molecules that can be used to enhance the performance of emerging battery technologies, solar cells, and digital displays.

The work appears in the journal Nature Communications.

"By identifying patterns in molecular behavior, the learning algorithm or 'machine' we created builds a knowledge base about atomic interactions within a...

11.10.2017 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing a digital twin

University of Texas and MIT researchers create virtual UAVs that can predict vehicle health, enable autonomous decision-making

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages, maybe even people, from location...

Im Focus: The coldest reaction

With ultracold chemistry, researchers get a first look at exactly what happens during a chemical reaction

The coldest chemical reaction in the known universe took place in what appears to be a chaotic mess of lasers. The appearance deceives: Deep within that...

Im Focus: How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue

Abnormal scarring is a serious threat resulting in non-healing chronic wounds or fibrosis. Scars form when fibroblasts, a type of cell of connective tissue, reach wounded skin and deposit plugs of extracellular matrix. Until today, the question about the exact anatomical origin of these fibroblasts has not been answered. In order to find potential ways of influencing the scarring process, the team of Dr. Yuval Rinkevich, Group Leader for Regenerative Biology at the Institute of Lung Biology and Disease at Helmholtz Zentrum München, aimed to finally find an answer. As it was already known that all scars derive from a fibroblast lineage expressing the Engrailed-1 gene - a lineage not only present in skin, but also in fascia - the researchers intentionally tried to understand whether or not fascia might be the origin of fibroblasts.

Fibroblasts kit - ready to heal wounds

Im Focus: McMaster researcher warns plastic pollution in Great Lakes growing concern to ecosystem

Research from a leading international expert on the health of the Great Lakes suggests that the growing intensity and scale of pollution from plastics poses serious risks to human health and will continue to have profound consequences on the ecosystem.

In an article published this month in the Journal of Waste Resources and Recycling, Gail Krantzberg, a professor in the Booth School of Engineering Practice...

Im Focus: Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Prototype microscope teaches itself the best illumination settings for diagnosing malaria

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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