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Earthquakes and climate change - is there a correlation?

The earth is changing. Those interested in understanding what role topography and climate change play with respect to earthquakes and other changes can learn more by reading innovations-report.

Climate change is receiving a lot of attention in the media. What causes climate change? Is climate change a natural process or is it created by man? What can be done to tackle climate change and how does the topography of the earth change as a result of climate change? These and many other questions are the focus of research activities by numerous scientists who are studying the effects of earthquakes, climate change and topography . The earth is not only our domicile. It also provides all of the resources we need. These resources can be negatively impacted by climate change and a changing topography however. Limiting or even impeding the impact of climate change are medium and long term goals of research in this area.

Sensing earthquakes around the world

The aim of earthquake and topography research is the implementation of new technologies that can predict the occurrence of such earthquakes, particularly severe earthquakes that can have immense consequences. Those interested can read the latest reports and news on the subject of earthquakes and topography to better understand how much progress is being made in the area of earthquake and topography research and why earthquakes and tremors can be measured not only locally, but also on the other side of the globe. While earthquakes can be a consequence of the topography, in turn they can also have an impact on the topography itself. innovations-report contains a wide range of insightful articles on the subject of earthquakes and topography that can also help one understand the interactions between earthquakes and topography.

The probability of earthquakes appears to be increasing, and with it changes to the earth's topography. innovations-report continuously publishes new information in the form of reports that cover issues such as whether climate change might play a role or if these are incidents that can't be controlled by man, or whether an early-warning detection system for earthquakes based on topology monitoring is really feasible to allow authorities to warn the public not only minutes, but hours or even days in advance.

From climate change to disaster?

Apart from earthquakes and topography, the subject of climate change and its impact on flora, fauna, man and the earth's topography are the focus of research activities and public discourse. Scientists and researchers are gathering at numerous international conferences to discuss the issue of impeding or limiting climate change in order to safeguard existing habitats and the earth's topography. While some experts are preaching that climate change is uncontainable, others assume that climate change is a natural cycle. Still others are calling for the industrial nations to immediately capitulate with respect to CO2 emissions as a means to contain climate change. innovations-reports offers readers various viewpoints with respect to climate change and its impact on the environment. innovations-report also continuously publishes new opinions from researchers and scientists on the subject of climate change, as well as findings from the fields of earthquake and topography research.

Stay up-to-date on the subjects of climate change, earthquake research and topology

innovations-report.com provides always up-to-date earth sciences reports covering climate change, earthquakes and topography. In order to supply readers with the latest substantiated scientific information, innovations-report continuously updates abstracts from research papers or press releases on the subject of earthquakes, climate change and topography .

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Latest News:

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Increasingly salty Mediterranean favors ice sheet growth

About 150,000 years ago, an anomalous ice age was triggered by an increasingly salty Mediterranean Sea, a development that’s occurring today and may start new ice sheet growth in the next few decades, according to a study at the University of Minnesota. Robert Johnson, an adjunct professor of geology and geophysics, will present his study of the glaciation 150,000 years ago and discuss its implications for today’s climate on Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the annual meeting of the Geological Society 25.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Better weather predictions in an avalanche of data

Sometimes getting too much of a good thing may create more problems than not getting enough - especially when it comes to the weather. Just ask Texas A&M University atmospheric scientist Fuqing Zhang, whose ensemble weather forecasting research is burdened with trillions of bytes of real-time data. Zhang’s quest, funded by a National Science Foundation grant of $295,500, is to find the best way to assimilate the most recent weather observation data for input into the latest computer fo 24.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

International scholars assess mysterious scroll found in mummy

During the second century B.C., a mummy-maker took a scroll of poetry and used it as stuffing for a corpse. The roll of papyrus remained hidden inside the mummy’s chest cavity until its rediscovery in the early 1990s. Today, what was once treated like trash survives as the oldest surviving example of a Greek poetry book, as well as an important source of information about the past. To glean as many clues from this ancient scroll as possible, the University of Cincinnati Department of Class 23.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

New map shows human ’footprint’ covers most of the Earth

But scientists say human effects can be a positive, not negative, factor for life on earth Human beings now directly influence more than three quarters of the earth’s landmass, according to a state-of-the-art map of the world produced by a team of scientists from the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). Published in the latest issue of the scientific journal BioScienc 23.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Great Progress Made by Seismologists in Identifying Violations of Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

Advances in detection devices and methods of analysis have allowed seismologists to identify virtually all events that might be nuclear explosions of possible military significance under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), according to Prof. Lynn R. Sykes of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Writing in the 29 October issue of Eos, published by the American Geophysical Union, Sykes analyzes 72 questionable events since 1960. Verification was a major issue in 23.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Giants joust in the cold

A new giant was born recently in the coastal waters of Antarctica. A series of images captured from May through the beginning of this month by ESA`s Envisat satellite shows the subsequent duel between the new iceberg and another as it breaks free of the Ross Ice Shelf and tries to move north. Christened C-19 by the US National Ice Centre in Maryland, the new iceberg measured 200 x 32 km, and about 200 m thick. As seen in the accompanying animation of images acquired by Envi 22.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Key to the Nature of Earth’s Mysterious Core Found Beneath Arctic Ice

In the high Canadian Arctic, researchers at the University of Rochester have stripped away some of the mystery surrounding the powerhouse that drives the Earth’s magnetic field. The research strongly suggests that several of the characteristics of the field that were long thought to operate independently of one another, such as the field’s polarity and strength, may be linked. If so, then the strength of the field, which has been waning for several thousand years, may herald a pole reversal 17.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Melting crust makes rich gold, copper deposits

A U of T study suggests why giant gold and copper deposits are found at some volcanoes but not others, a finding that could point prospectors to large deposits of this and other valuable metals. “There’s one characteristic that is common to all of these big gold and copper deposits anywhere in the world,” says Professor James Mungall of the Department of Geology. The ocean’s crust that is pushed down under a volcano can start to melt, which it doesn’t normally do. His study, which appea 16.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano is beginning to stir, new data reveal

Mauna Loa - Hawaii’s biggest and potentially most destructive volcano - is showing signs of life again nearly two decades after its last eruption. Recent geophysical data collected on the surface of the 13,500-foot volcano revealed that Mauna Loa’s summit caldera has begun to swell and stretch at a rate of 2 to 2.5 inches a year, according to scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Stanford University. Surface inflation can be a precursor of a volcanic eruption 15.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Purdue scientist adds third dimension to earth beneath our feet

The swirl of malleable rock in the earth’s mantle – located between the earth’s crust and core – may have greater effect on the earth’s surface than was once believed, a Purdue research team reports. Using computer technology to create three-dimensional models of the earth’s mantle, Purdue’s Scott King has found evidence that some dramatic features of the earth’s surface could be the result of relatively rapid shifts in the direction in which crustal plat 15.10.2002 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: ScanCut project completed: laser cutting enables more intricate plug connector designs

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT have come up with a striking new addition to contact stamping technologies in the ERDF research project ScanCut. In collaboration with industry partners from North Rhine-Westphalia, the Aachen-based team of researchers developed a hybrid manufacturing process for the laser cutting of thin-walled metal strips. This new process makes it possible to fabricate even the tiniest details of contact parts in an eco-friendly, high-precision and efficient manner.

Plug connectors are tiny and, at first glance, unremarkable – yet modern vehicles would be unable to function without them. Several thousand plug connectors...

Im Focus: New Strategy Against Osteoporosis

An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.

Osteoporosis is the most common age-related bone disease which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. It is estimated that one in three women...

Im Focus: AI & single-cell genomics

New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions - but they do this with static snapshots only...

Im Focus: TU Graz Researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications

“Core-shell” clusters pave the way for new efficient nanomaterials that make catalysts, magnetic and laser sensors or measuring devices for detecting electromagnetic radiation more efficient.

Whether in innovative high-tech materials, more powerful computer chips, pharmaceuticals or in the field of renewable energies, nanoparticles – smallest...

Im Focus: Tailored light inspired by nature

An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Münster develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses.

Modern applications as high resolution microsopy or micro- or nanoscale material processing require customized laser beams that do not change during...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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