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Earthquakes and climate change - is there a correlation?

The earth is changing. Those interested in understanding what role topography and climate change play with respect to earthquakes and other changes can learn more by reading innovations-report.

Climate change is receiving a lot of attention in the media. What causes climate change? Is climate change a natural process or is it created by man? What can be done to tackle climate change and how does the topography of the earth change as a result of climate change? These and many other questions are the focus of research activities by numerous scientists who are studying the effects of earthquakes, climate change and topography . The earth is not only our domicile. It also provides all of the resources we need. These resources can be negatively impacted by climate change and a changing topography however. Limiting or even impeding the impact of climate change are medium and long term goals of research in this area.

Sensing earthquakes around the world

The aim of earthquake and topography research is the implementation of new technologies that can predict the occurrence of such earthquakes, particularly severe earthquakes that can have immense consequences. Those interested can read the latest reports and news on the subject of earthquakes and topography to better understand how much progress is being made in the area of earthquake and topography research and why earthquakes and tremors can be measured not only locally, but also on the other side of the globe. While earthquakes can be a consequence of the topography, in turn they can also have an impact on the topography itself. innovations-report contains a wide range of insightful articles on the subject of earthquakes and topography that can also help one understand the interactions between earthquakes and topography.

The probability of earthquakes appears to be increasing, and with it changes to the earth's topography. innovations-report continuously publishes new information in the form of reports that cover issues such as whether climate change might play a role or if these are incidents that can't be controlled by man, or whether an early-warning detection system for earthquakes based on topology monitoring is really feasible to allow authorities to warn the public not only minutes, but hours or even days in advance.

From climate change to disaster?

Apart from earthquakes and topography, the subject of climate change and its impact on flora, fauna, man and the earth's topography are the focus of research activities and public discourse. Scientists and researchers are gathering at numerous international conferences to discuss the issue of impeding or limiting climate change in order to safeguard existing habitats and the earth's topography. While some experts are preaching that climate change is uncontainable, others assume that climate change is a natural cycle. Still others are calling for the industrial nations to immediately capitulate with respect to CO2 emissions as a means to contain climate change. innovations-reports offers readers various viewpoints with respect to climate change and its impact on the environment. innovations-report also continuously publishes new opinions from researchers and scientists on the subject of climate change, as well as findings from the fields of earthquake and topography research.

Stay up-to-date on the subjects of climate change, earthquake research and topology

innovations-report.com provides always up-to-date earth sciences reports covering climate change, earthquakes and topography. In order to supply readers with the latest substantiated scientific information, innovations-report continuously updates abstracts from research papers or press releases on the subject of earthquakes, climate change and topography .

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Latest News:

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Marsquake detection sensors will take search for water underground

Researchers at Imperial College London have just begun a 5-year project to design and build tiny earthquake measuring devices to go to Mars on the 2007 NetLander mission. Unlike the instruments on next year`s European Mars Express/Beagle II mission, the Marsquake sensors will be the first to look deep inside the planet. The internal structure of Mars is a key to understanding some fundamental questions about the planet including whether life ever existed there. The sensors are c 31.05.2002 | nachricht Read more

Scientists Recreate Martian Environment

Scientists at the University of Leicester’s Space Research Centre are recreating the hostile environment found on Mars in their laboratory, with a device known as the Martian Environment Simulator (MES). The machine reproduces the temperature, air pressure and unbreathable atmosphere known to exist on Mars. The MES is currently being used to test equipment on the Beagle 2 lander, part of the European Space Agency’s Mars Express Spacecraft and due to arrive on Mars during Christmas 2003. The chance o 31.05.2002 | nachricht Read more

Bacterium May Reveal Location of Gold Deposits

Gold prospectors may one day rely on lowly bacteria to point them to deposits of the precious metal. Researchers have discovered that gold-laden soil often contains an abundance of spores belonging to a certain bacterium. The affinity humans have for gold aside, the ore in its soluble form is actually highly toxic to most living things. The common bacterium Bacillus cereus , however, possesses a unique resistance to the metal, allowing it to survive in a relatively vacant environmental niche: 22.05.2002 | nachricht Read more

Ocean Cores May Give Clues On Climate Change

Core samples taken from far below the ocean floor are helping a University of Edinburgh geologist to form a picture of dramatic climate changes which took place 30 to 40 million years ago. Dr Bridget Wade is part of an international team of scientists studying climate shifts between the Eocene period – the warmest cycle in the last 65 million years – and the cooler Oligocene period, which saw the first major build-up of Antarctic ice. The study could shed new light on present climate trends as the Eo 06.05.2002 | nachricht Read more

Oldest fossil footprints on land

Animals may have beaten upright plants to land. The oldest fossils of footprints ever found on land hint that animals may have beaten plants out of the primordial seas. Lobster-sized, centipede-like animals made the prints wading out of the ocean and scuttling over sand dunes about 530 million years ago. Previous fossils indicated that animals didn’t take this step until 40 million years later. "It’s staggering that we thought for all this time that animals appeared on land 30.04.2002 | nachricht Read more

Tourists chill out on tundra

Winds bring change to Alaskan winter. A drop in wind speed may be boosting Alaska’s tourist trade. Some parts of the tundra feel five degrees warmer than they did 50 years ago, even though average winter air temperatures have risen only by one or two degrees since then, new research finds 1 . This local trend hints that forecasts of the impacts of climate change may need to account for wind as well as temperature. The temperature can still plummet to -40 24.04.2002 | nachricht Read more

Marine researchers explore sediment highways

A European team of researchers has demonstrated that sediment is transported to the deep sea via canyons in the seabed. The sediment accumulates in the head of the submarine canyons. At the end of the canyons, mud avalanches disperse into the deep sea. Scientists from the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) presented their findings at an international congress held from 7 to 10 April 2002. With bottom landers, onboard the ship R.V. Pelagia, the researchers explored the Nazaré Canyo 19.04.2002 | nachricht Read more

How Life Originated In Space

Life originated on the Earth more than 3.5 billion years ago. However, the scientists are still disputing over the possible sources of the life origin. The matter is that life on our planet evolved from the molecular level to the level of bacteria organisms within 0.5 - 1 billion years, this period being very short for such an important evolutionary step. The researchers are still racking the brains over this mystery. One of the popular hypothesis asserts that some germs of life have been brought to 15.04.2002 | nachricht Read more

Was El Niño unaffected by the Little Ice Age ?

An extremely intense El Niño event in 1983 prompted an international surveillance programme, involving the deployment of moored or drift measurement buoys and observation satellites. This research effort is proving to be fruitful. The data obtained provide a key to understanding how the two components of the now-famous two-phase system El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) -El Niño and its reverse counterpart La Niña- are generated. Forecasting models for three months in advance are quite reliable. How 27.03.2002 | nachricht Read more

Global Warming: changing climate of opinion

In the 1960s, scientists anticipated a `New Ice Age`. Later, they warned of humans triggering a ‘Nuclear Winter’. Now, it’s ‘Global Warming’. Why this change in emphasis? And why did it take 100 years for the theory behind ‘Global Warming’ to take hold? New research by scientists from the University of Gloucestershire indicates that a remarkable combination of circumstances sparked widespread scientific interest in ‘Global Warming’ in the later decades of the 20th Century. Prof. 26.03.2002 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

Im Focus: Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

DNA is not only a popular research topic because it contains the blueprint for life – it can also be used to produce tiny components for technical applications.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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