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Blasting off to Mercury and other planets with astronomy

Man has always been drawn to the discovery of alien worlds and planets. And this urge has reached its zenith thanks to astronomy and travel to alien planets.

Astronomy adds a whole new dimension to the scientific impulse to discover and conquer other planets and systems beyond earth's realm. Astronomy allows scientists to not only carry out earth-based observations of planets such as Mercury. It also provides the basis for the continual discovery of new galaxies and unknown planets. Astronomy has made huge advances, due in part to the exploration of Mercury. innovations-report provides continuous coverage of the general advances being made in astronomy, as well as those specific to the discovery of Mercury, in continuously updated articles and scientific reports about astronomy, Mercury and other planets and galaxies.

Scientific look at Mercury

innovations-report encompasses a comprehensive astronomy database filled with a rich assortment articles and reports on all areas of science, research and innovations. This of course includes a large selection of documents on physics and astronomy. Whether it's achievements in astronomy, the discovery of new planets or progress in the journey to Mercury, innovations-report provides readers all of the latest developments from numerous independent research sources on the subjects of "Mercury", "planets" and general astronomy.

Astronomy - an interdisciplinary field

Apart from finding the right documents and sources covering technical advances in astronomy, readers can also learn about the findings and thought processes of other disciplines (philosophy for instance) that are actively examining astronomy and its approaches, as well as plans for journeys to planets like Mercury. The database contains a large selection of free information and articles covering basic issues ranging from "How far is Mercury from earth? " to the composition of Mercury and other planets. The path to the various planets, be it Mars, Pluto or Mercury, is not necessarily light years removed. A visit to innovations-report leads the reader to remote worlds of astronomy, alien planets and galaxies, planets related to Mars and Mercury, through the Milky Way and into black holes. Or simply put, through the entire cosmos of astronomy.

How heavy is Mercury?

Determining the weight of a planet like Mercury would appear to be a difficult undertaking. After all, it's not as simple as placing a planet on a scale, whether it's Mercury or some other planet. Such aspects are nevertheless a part of astronomy. With innovations-report.com, readers can get an exciting look at the world of astronomy, Mercury and other planets. Among other information, you can find reports that explain how researchers go about calculating the weight and dimensions of Mercury and other planets. Astronomy does not involve dreaming. Instead, it has more to do with applying methods and strategies from the field of physics. The distance to the planets is a constant challenge for researchers. Those with an interest in astronomy can rely on innovations-report to discover how scientists tackle these challenges, what knowledge they have gained about planets such as Mercury and the progress toward journeys to other planets.

Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

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From the Big Bang to the Cosmic Renaissance

Nowadays, the Universe is pervaded by energetic ultraviolet radiation, produced by quasars and hot stars. The short-wavelength photons liberate electrons from the hydrogen atoms that make up the diffuse intergalactic medium and the latter is therefore almost completely ionised. There was, however, an early epoch in the history of the Universe when this was not so. The Universe emanated from a hot and extremely dense initial state, the so-called Big Bang. Astronomers now believe that it took 21.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

Astronomers hope for good weather - on Mars

As well as keeping their fingers crossed for good weather during next week’s close approach of Mars, astronomers are hoping that the skies will be clear on Mars itself. During National Astronomy Week - Saturday 23 to Saturday 30 August - observing events will be held across the UK where the public can view Mars through telescopes. It is expected that thousands of people will turn out to see the planet closer than it has been for almost 60,000 years. But it’’s not just our own 21.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

ESA sees stardust storms heading for Solar System

Until ten years ago, most astronomers did not believe stardust could enter our Solar System. Then ESA’’s Ulysses spaceprobe discovered minute stardust particles leaking through the Sun’s magnetic shield, into the realm of Earth and the other planets. Now, the same spaceprobe has shown that a flood of dusty particles is heading our way. Since its launch in 1990, Ulysses has constantly monitored how much stardust enters the Solar System from the interstellar space around it. Usi 20.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

UK Astronomers look forward to looking back

When NASA launches its Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) - the agency’s fourth ‘Great Observatory’ - later this week, astronomers around the world will be looking forward to using one of the most powerful time machines ever built. Among those anticipating the opportunity to look back billions of years to an era when the universe was in its youth are Professor Michael Rowan-Robinson (Imperial College London) and Dr. Sebastian Oliver (University of Sussex), who will be participating in 19.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

SMART-1 – All Set to Fly to the Moon

Europe is going to the Moon for the first time! In just over two weeks the European Space Agency’s (ESA) lunar probe, SMART-1, begins its journey to the Moon. Due to be launched from Kourou in French Guiana on 3rd September (12.04 a.m. 4th September BST) SMART-1 will be powered only by an ion engine which Europe will be testing for the first time as the main spacecraft propulsion. Onboard will be D-CIXS, an X-ray spectrometer built by scientists in the UK, which will provide information on what the 18.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

MINOS detector ready to take first data

Today, (August 14th), sees the start of data collection on the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) detector, situated in the Soudan iron mine, Minnesota, USA. UK particle physicists, working within an international collaboration, will use the MINOS detector to investigate the phenomenon of neutrino mass – a puzzle that goes to the heart of our understanding of the Universe. Neutrinos are pointlike, abundant particles with very little mass. They exist in three types or ‘flavour 15.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

Scientists discover cheap and environmentally friendly way to dispose of waste from nuclear power plants

Scientists from the University of Strathclyde, collaborating with an international team from Imperial College, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory(RAL), ITU (Karlsruhe) and the University of Jena, have successfully turned the radioactive isotope Iodine-129, a major waste product in the nuclear power industry, into the more friendly isotope Iodine-128 using laboratory lasers. This is the first time an isotope has been transmuted. They announced their discovery today in The Institute of Physics journal Jour 14.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

Holiday weather on Mars

ESA’s Mars Express is due to arrive at Mars in December 2003, and its Beagle 2 lander will be making a touchdown in the middle of the Martian winter. Will it see a ’’white Christmas’’ on the Red Planet? Also, if humans one day go to Mars, would they need to take a sunscreen? Over its four-year lifetime, Mars Express will be returning data to refine the latest computer models of the Martian climate. It will be closely watching the clouds, fog, dust devils, and storms, 13.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

Single Photon Detector Conquers the Dark Side

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Boston University have demonstrated a detector that counts single pulses of light, while simultaneously reducing false or “dark counts” to virtually zero. Reported in the July 28, 2003, issue of Applied Physics Letters*, the advance provides a key technology needed for future development of secure quantum communications and cryptography. Quantum communications and cryptography is a codemaker’s Holy Grai 13.08.2003 | nachricht Read more

Purdue physicists hone rules for nanotech game

Nanotechnologists could have a firmer handle on the forces at play in their microscopic world thanks to recent physics research at Purdue University. The latest in a series of experiments aimed at revealing fundamental knowledge of the universe has yielded precise measurement of the so-called Casimir force – a force that could make tiny machines behave erratically, causing a thorn in the side of nanotechnology manufacturers. A team, including Purdue physicist Ephraim Fischbach, has answered 12.08.2003 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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