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Blasting off to Mercury and other planets with astronomy

Man has always been drawn to the discovery of alien worlds and planets. And this urge has reached its zenith thanks to astronomy and travel to alien planets.

Astronomy adds a whole new dimension to the scientific impulse to discover and conquer other planets and systems beyond earth's realm. Astronomy allows scientists to not only carry out earth-based observations of planets such as Mercury. It also provides the basis for the continual discovery of new galaxies and unknown planets. Astronomy has made huge advances, due in part to the exploration of Mercury. innovations-report provides continuous coverage of the general advances being made in astronomy, as well as those specific to the discovery of Mercury, in continuously updated articles and scientific reports about astronomy, Mercury and other planets and galaxies.

Scientific look at Mercury

innovations-report encompasses a comprehensive astronomy database filled with a rich assortment articles and reports on all areas of science, research and innovations. This of course includes a large selection of documents on physics and astronomy. Whether it's achievements in astronomy, the discovery of new planets or progress in the journey to Mercury, innovations-report provides readers all of the latest developments from numerous independent research sources on the subjects of "Mercury", "planets" and general astronomy.

Astronomy - an interdisciplinary field

Apart from finding the right documents and sources covering technical advances in astronomy, readers can also learn about the findings and thought processes of other disciplines (philosophy for instance) that are actively examining astronomy and its approaches, as well as plans for journeys to planets like Mercury. The database contains a large selection of free information and articles covering basic issues ranging from "How far is Mercury from earth? " to the composition of Mercury and other planets. The path to the various planets, be it Mars, Pluto or Mercury, is not necessarily light years removed. A visit to innovations-report leads the reader to remote worlds of astronomy, alien planets and galaxies, planets related to Mars and Mercury, through the Milky Way and into black holes. Or simply put, through the entire cosmos of astronomy.

How heavy is Mercury?

Determining the weight of a planet like Mercury would appear to be a difficult undertaking. After all, it's not as simple as placing a planet on a scale, whether it's Mercury or some other planet. Such aspects are nevertheless a part of astronomy. With innovations-report.com, readers can get an exciting look at the world of astronomy, Mercury and other planets. Among other information, you can find reports that explain how researchers go about calculating the weight and dimensions of Mercury and other planets. Astronomy does not involve dreaming. Instead, it has more to do with applying methods and strategies from the field of physics. The distance to the planets is a constant challenge for researchers. Those with an interest in astronomy can rely on innovations-report to discover how scientists tackle these challenges, what knowledge they have gained about planets such as Mercury and the progress toward journeys to other planets.

Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

Latest News:

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New 'styrofoam' planet provides tools in search for habitable planets

Highly inflated gas giant orbits bright southern star

Fifth-graders making styrofoam solar system models may have the right idea. Researchers at Lehigh University have discovered a new planet orbiting a star 320...

16.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

International team solves mystery of colloidal chains

Team discovers fast, simple way to create two-dimensional electronic circuits

When Northwestern Engineering's Erik Luijten met Zbigniew Rozynek, they immediately became united by a mystery.

15.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.

Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds. Molecules and sections of macromolecules are...

15.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

'Fire-streaks' are created in collisions of atomic nuclei

At very high energies, the collision of massive atomic nuclei in an accelerator generates hundreds or even thousands of particles that undergo numerous interactions. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, Poland it has been shown that the course of this complex process can be represented by a surprisingly simple model: extremely hot matter moves away from the impact point, stretching along the original flight path in streaks, and the further the streak is from the plane of the collision, the greater its velocity.

When two massive atomic nuclei collide at high energies, the most exotic form of matter is formed: the quark-gluon plasma behaving like a perfect fluid. The...

12.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

New understanding of superconductor's 'normal' state may help solve longstanding puzzle

Since the discovery two decades ago of the unconventional topological superconductor Sr2RuO4, scientists have extensively investigated its properties at temperatures below its 1°K critical temperature (Tc), at which a phase transition from a metal to superconducting state occurs. Now experiments done at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the Madhavan and Abbamonte laboratories, in collaboration with researchers at six institutions in the U.S., Canada, United Kingdom, and Japan, have shed new light on the electronic properties of this material at temperatures 4°K above Tc. The team's findings may elucidate yet-unresolved questions about Sr2RuO4's emergent properties in the superconducting state.

Vidya Madhavan, a physics professor and member of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab at the U. of I., led the experiment. She explains, "We began from...

12.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surface

In looking at NASA images of Mars a few years ago, Brown University geologist Peter Schultz noticed sets of strange bright streaks emanating from a few large-impact craters on the planet's surface. The streaks are odd in that they extend much farther from the craters than normal ejecta patterns, and they are only visible in thermal infrared images taken during the Martian night.

Using geological observation, laboratory impact experiments and computer modeling, Schultz and Brown graduate student Stephanie Quintana have offered a new...

12.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

Observatories combine to crack open the Crab Nebula

Astronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves seen by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to the powerful X-ray glow as seen by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. And, in between that range of wavelengths, the Hubble Space Telescope's crisp visible-light view, and the infrared perspective of the Spitzer Space Telescope.

The Crab Nebula, the result of a bright supernova explosion seen by Chinese and other astronomers in the year 1054, is 6,500 light-years from Earth.

11.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the future

Thanks to innovative laser techniques, a class of materials shows a new potential for energy efficiency. The research is published in Nature Physics

Another step forward towards superconductivity at room temperature: an experiment at the cutting edge of condensed matter physics and materials science has...

10.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

Two James Webb instruments are best suited for exoplanet atmospheres

The best way to study the atmospheres of distant worlds with the James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled to launch in late 2018, will combine two of its infrared instruments, according to a team of astronomers.

"We wanted to know which combination of observing modes (of Webb) gets you the maximum information content for the minimum cost," says Natasha Batalha,...

10.05.2017 | nachricht Read more

Space weather model simulates solar storms from nowhere

Our ever-changing sun continuously shoots solar material into space. The grandest such events are massive clouds that erupt from the sun, called coronal mass ejections, or CMEs. These solar storms often come first with some kind of warning -- the bright flash of a flare, a burst of heat or a flurry of solar energetic particles. But another kind of storm has puzzled scientists for its lack of typical warning signs: They seem to come from nowhere, and scientists call them stealth CMEs.

Now, an international team of scientists, led by the Space Sciences Laboratory at University of California, Berkeley, and funded in part by NASA, has developed...

09.05.2017 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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