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Blasting off to Mercury and other planets with astronomy

Man has always been drawn to the discovery of alien worlds and planets. And this urge has reached its zenith thanks to astronomy and travel to alien planets.

Astronomy adds a whole new dimension to the scientific impulse to discover and conquer other planets and systems beyond earth's realm. Astronomy allows scientists to not only carry out earth-based observations of planets such as Mercury. It also provides the basis for the continual discovery of new galaxies and unknown planets. Astronomy has made huge advances, due in part to the exploration of Mercury. innovations-report provides continuous coverage of the general advances being made in astronomy, as well as those specific to the discovery of Mercury, in continuously updated articles and scientific reports about astronomy, Mercury and other planets and galaxies.

Scientific look at Mercury

innovations-report encompasses a comprehensive astronomy database filled with a rich assortment articles and reports on all areas of science, research and innovations. This of course includes a large selection of documents on physics and astronomy. Whether it's achievements in astronomy, the discovery of new planets or progress in the journey to Mercury, innovations-report provides readers all of the latest developments from numerous independent research sources on the subjects of "Mercury", "planets" and general astronomy.

Astronomy - an interdisciplinary field

Apart from finding the right documents and sources covering technical advances in astronomy, readers can also learn about the findings and thought processes of other disciplines (philosophy for instance) that are actively examining astronomy and its approaches, as well as plans for journeys to planets like Mercury. The database contains a large selection of free information and articles covering basic issues ranging from "How far is Mercury from earth? " to the composition of Mercury and other planets. The path to the various planets, be it Mars, Pluto or Mercury, is not necessarily light years removed. A visit to innovations-report leads the reader to remote worlds of astronomy, alien planets and galaxies, planets related to Mars and Mercury, through the Milky Way and into black holes. Or simply put, through the entire cosmos of astronomy.

How heavy is Mercury?

Determining the weight of a planet like Mercury would appear to be a difficult undertaking. After all, it's not as simple as placing a planet on a scale, whether it's Mercury or some other planet. Such aspects are nevertheless a part of astronomy. With innovations-report.com, readers can get an exciting look at the world of astronomy, Mercury and other planets. Among other information, you can find reports that explain how researchers go about calculating the weight and dimensions of Mercury and other planets. Astronomy does not involve dreaming. Instead, it has more to do with applying methods and strategies from the field of physics. The distance to the planets is a constant challenge for researchers. Those with an interest in astronomy can rely on innovations-report to discover how scientists tackle these challenges, what knowledge they have gained about planets such as Mercury and the progress toward journeys to other planets.

Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

Latest News:

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Switching to spintronics

Berkeley Lab reports on electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temp

In a development that holds promise for future magnetic memory and logic devices, researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley...

18.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

Ultrafast imaging of complex systems in 3-D at near atomic resolution becoming increasingly possible

It is becoming possible to image complex systems in 3-D with near-atomic resolution on ultrafast timescales using extremely intense X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses.

One important step toward ultrafast imaging of samples with a single X-ray shot is understanding the interaction of extremely brilliant and intense X-ray...

18.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

NASA’s MAVEN Mission Identifies Links in Chain Leading to Atmospheric Loss

Early discoveries by NASA’s newest Mars orbiter are starting to reveal key features about the loss of the planet’s atmosphere to space over time.

The findings are among the first returns from NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, which entered its science phase on Nov. 16. The...

15.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

Control on shape of light particles opens the way to ‘quantum internet’

In the same way as we now connect computers in networks through optical signals, it could also be possible to connect future quantum computers in a ‘quantum internet’.

The optical signals would then consist of individual light particles or photons. One prerequisite for a working quantum internet is control of the shape of...

15.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

SwRI scientists develop solar observatory for use on suborbital manned space missions

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is preparing to unveil a new, miniature portable solar observatory for use onboard a commercial, manned suborbital spacecraft. The SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform (SSIPP) will be on exhibit at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), Dec. 16-19, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, Calif.

Using reusable suborbital commercial spacecraft for the SSIPP development effort improves on a traditional space instrument development process that goes back...

12.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

Interstellar mystery solved by supercomputer simulations

Galaxy evolution modeled on NSF XSEDE Stampede supercomputer of the Texas Advanced Computing Center

An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made.

12.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

Swarms of Pluto-Size Objects Kick Up Dust around Adolescent Sun-Like Star

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) may have detected the dusty hallmarks of an entire family of Pluto-size objects swarming around an adolescent version of our own Sun.

By making detailed observations of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the star known as HD 107146, the astronomers detected an unexpected increase in the...

12.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

First overview of laser-induced damage

The newly published book „Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials“ gives a comprehensive overview of laser-induced damage effects in optical components. The book, edited by Prof. Dr. Detlev Ristau, Head of the Laser Components Department at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH), is a collection of contributions by leading scientists in the field optical components and laser technology.

The main theme of the book is laser-induced damage, which can occur in the bulk, on the surface or in the coating of optical components, when higher laser...

12.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

Researchers Demonstrate New Way To Plug 'Leaky' Light Cavities

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have demonstrated a new and more efficient way to trap light, using a phenomenon called bound states in the continuum (BIC) that was first proposed in the early days of quantum wave mechanics.

Boubacar Kanté, an assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, and his postdoctoral researcher...

11.12.2014 | nachricht Read more

New Research Offers Explanation for Titan Sand Dune Mystery

Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon in our solar system, it has a dense atmosphere.

 Thanks to imagery from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, we also know that Titan has rivers and lakes made of ethane and methane, as well as windswept sand dunes...

10.12.2014 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Switching to spintronics

Berkeley Lab reports on electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temp

In a development that holds promise for future magnetic memory and logic devices, researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley...

Im Focus: Bugs life: The nerve cells that make locusts 'gang up'

A team of biologists has identified a set of nerve cells in desert locusts that bring about 'gang-like' gregarious behaviour when they are forced into a crowd.

Dr Swidbert Ott from the University of Leicester's Department of Biology, working with Dr Steve Rogers at the University of Sydney, Australia, has published a...

Im Focus: How the brain can distinguish good from bad smells

Scientists from the BMBF Research Group Olfactory Coding at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, identify the lateral horn in the brain of fruit flies as the processing center for behaviorally relevant odor information.

Whether an odor is pleasant or disgusting to an organism is not just a matter of taste. Often, an organism’s survival depends on its ability to make just such...

Im Focus: Artificial gemstones for telecommunication

Who is not impressed by the play of colors that opals and other gemstones create?

Inspired by the interaction of opals with light, Dr. Alexander Kühne investigates and develops artificial opals for future applications in the fields of...

Im Focus: Neurons listen to glia cells

Communication in the brain: research collaboration uncovers a novel mechanism of altered information processing between neurons / Responsible is a distinct class of glial cells / Major relevance for learning and processing of sensory input / Publication in the prestigious journal PLoS Biology

Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have discovered a new signal pathway in the brain that plays an important role in learning...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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