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Blasting off to Mercury and other planets with astronomy

Man has always been drawn to the discovery of alien worlds and planets. And this urge has reached its zenith thanks to astronomy and travel to alien planets.

Astronomy adds a whole new dimension to the scientific impulse to discover and conquer other planets and systems beyond earth's realm. Astronomy allows scientists to not only carry out earth-based observations of planets such as Mercury. It also provides the basis for the continual discovery of new galaxies and unknown planets. Astronomy has made huge advances, due in part to the exploration of Mercury. innovations-report provides continuous coverage of the general advances being made in astronomy, as well as those specific to the discovery of Mercury, in continuously updated articles and scientific reports about astronomy, Mercury and other planets and galaxies.

Scientific look at Mercury

innovations-report encompasses a comprehensive astronomy database filled with a rich assortment articles and reports on all areas of science, research and innovations. This of course includes a large selection of documents on physics and astronomy. Whether it's achievements in astronomy, the discovery of new planets or progress in the journey to Mercury, innovations-report provides readers all of the latest developments from numerous independent research sources on the subjects of "Mercury", "planets" and general astronomy.

Astronomy - an interdisciplinary field

Apart from finding the right documents and sources covering technical advances in astronomy, readers can also learn about the findings and thought processes of other disciplines (philosophy for instance) that are actively examining astronomy and its approaches, as well as plans for journeys to planets like Mercury. The database contains a large selection of free information and articles covering basic issues ranging from "How far is Mercury from earth? " to the composition of Mercury and other planets. The path to the various planets, be it Mars, Pluto or Mercury, is not necessarily light years removed. A visit to innovations-report leads the reader to remote worlds of astronomy, alien planets and galaxies, planets related to Mars and Mercury, through the Milky Way and into black holes. Or simply put, through the entire cosmos of astronomy.

How heavy is Mercury?

Determining the weight of a planet like Mercury would appear to be a difficult undertaking. After all, it's not as simple as placing a planet on a scale, whether it's Mercury or some other planet. Such aspects are nevertheless a part of astronomy. With innovations-report.com, readers can get an exciting look at the world of astronomy, Mercury and other planets. Among other information, you can find reports that explain how researchers go about calculating the weight and dimensions of Mercury and other planets. Astronomy does not involve dreaming. Instead, it has more to do with applying methods and strategies from the field of physics. The distance to the planets is a constant challenge for researchers. Those with an interest in astronomy can rely on innovations-report to discover how scientists tackle these challenges, what knowledge they have gained about planets such as Mercury and the progress toward journeys to other planets.

Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

Latest News:

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University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip

Device could improve wireless communications systems

During a thunderstorm, we all know that it is common to hear thunder after we see the lightning. That’s because sound travels much slower (768 miles per hour)...

27.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

NASA's Van Allen Probes Spot an Impenetrable Barrier in Space

Two donuts of seething radiation that surround Earth, called the Van Allen radiation belts, have been found to contain a nearly impenetrable barrier that prevents the fastest, most energetic electrons from reaching Earth.

The Van Allen belts are a collection of charged particles, gathered in place by Earth’s magnetic field. They can wax and wane in response to incoming energy...

27.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

One year in space: University satellite proves its durability

UWE-3, the satellite developed by the University of Würzburg, is a technical marvel: On November 21, it has been in space for exactly a year – and it is still functioning perfectly. This is an extraordinary feat given the harsh conditions in outer space and the fact that the satellite was built solely from commercial components.

UWE-3 is one of a new generation of experimental satellites developed by the University of Würzburg (short: UWE): This mini-satellite is even more compact and...

27.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos


Physicists at the University of Kansas have fabricated an innovative substance from two different atomic sheets that interlock much like Lego toy bricks. The...

26.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world

Characterization of X-ray flashes open new perspectives in X-ray science

Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using...

25.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

Climate Control in Termite Mounds

Periodic fluctuations in outside temperature drive ventilation in termite mounds because of the design of the design of the mounds, according to researchers at Harvard and MIT

When they make their way into homes, some species of termites can be destructive pests. Their fungus-harvesting relatives in Africa and Asia, however, are...

25.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

Asteroid impacts on Earth make structurally bizarre diamonds, say ASU scientists

Scientists have argued for half a century about the existence of a form of diamond called lonsdaleite, which is associated with impacts by meteorites and asteroids. A group of scientists based mostly at Arizona State University now show that what has been called lonsdaleite is in fact a structurally disordered form of ordinary diamond.

The scientists' report is published in Nature Communications, Nov. 20, by Péter Németh, a former ASU visiting researcher (now with the Research Centre of...

25.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

Cooling With the Coldest Matter in the World

Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a new cooling technique for mechanical quantum systems. Using an ultracold atomic gas, the vibrations of a membrane were cooled down to less than 1 degree above absolute zero. This technique may enable novel studies of quantum physics and precision measurement devices, as the researchers report in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Ultracold atomic gases are among the coldest objects in existence. Laser beams can be used to trap atoms inside a vacuum chamber and slow down their motion to...

25.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

Gas cloud in the galactic centre is part of a larger gas streamer

In November, astronomers at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics presented new observations of the gas cloud G2 in the galactic centre originally discovered in 2011. These data are in remarkably good agreement with an on-going tidal disruption.

As a complete surprise came the discovery that the orbit of G2 matches that of another gas cloud detected a decade ago, suggesting that G2 might actually be...

24.11.2014 | nachricht Read more

It's filamentary: How galaxies evolve in the cosmic web

UC Riverside-led team proposes that filaments in the cosmic web played a critical role in the distant universe

How do galaxies like our Milky Way form, and just how do they evolve? Are galaxies affected by their surrounding environment? An international team of...

21.11.2014 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: German supercomputer is a world champion in saving energy

The new "L-CSC" supercomputer at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research is ranked as the world's most energy-efficient supercomputer. The new supercomputer reached first place on the "Green500" list published in New Orleans, comparing the energy efficiency of the fastest supercomputers around the world. "L-CSC" was developed at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS) and the Goethe University.

The new "L-CSC" supercomputer at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research is ranked as the world's most energy-efficient supercomputer. The new...

Im Focus: Research yields material made of single-atom layers that snap together like Legos


Physicists at the University of Kansas have fabricated an innovative substance from two different atomic sheets that interlock much like Lego toy bricks. The...

Im Focus: Cooling With the Coldest Matter in the World

Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a new cooling technique for mechanical quantum systems. Using an ultracold atomic gas, the vibrations of a membrane were cooled down to less than 1 degree above absolute zero. This technique may enable novel studies of quantum physics and precision measurement devices, as the researchers report in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Ultracold atomic gases are among the coldest objects in existence. Laser beams can be used to trap atoms inside a vacuum chamber and slow down their motion to...

Im Focus: Permafrost soil is possible source of abrupt rise in greenhouse gases at end of last ice age

Scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have identified a possible source of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases that were abruptly released to the atmosphere in large quantities around 14,600 years ago.

According to this new interpretation, the CO2 – released during the onset of the Bølling/Allerød warm period – presumably had their origin in thawing Arctic...

Im Focus: Small volcanic eruptions could be slowing global warming

Small volcanic eruptions might eject more of an atmosphere-cooling gas into Earth’s upper atmosphere than previously thought, potentially contributing to the recent slowdown in global warming, according to a new study.

Scientists have long known that volcanoes can cool the atmosphere, mainly by means of sulfur dioxide gas that eruptions expel. Droplets of sulfuric acid that...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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