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Blasting off to Mercury and other planets with astronomy

Man has always been drawn to the discovery of alien worlds and planets. And this urge has reached its zenith thanks to astronomy and travel to alien planets.

Astronomy adds a whole new dimension to the scientific impulse to discover and conquer other planets and systems beyond earth's realm. Astronomy allows scientists to not only carry out earth-based observations of planets such as Mercury. It also provides the basis for the continual discovery of new galaxies and unknown planets. Astronomy has made huge advances, due in part to the exploration of Mercury. innovations-report provides continuous coverage of the general advances being made in astronomy, as well as those specific to the discovery of Mercury, in continuously updated articles and scientific reports about astronomy, Mercury and other planets and galaxies.

Scientific look at Mercury

innovations-report encompasses a comprehensive astronomy database filled with a rich assortment articles and reports on all areas of science, research and innovations. This of course includes a large selection of documents on physics and astronomy. Whether it's achievements in astronomy, the discovery of new planets or progress in the journey to Mercury, innovations-report provides readers all of the latest developments from numerous independent research sources on the subjects of "Mercury", "planets" and general astronomy.

Astronomy - an interdisciplinary field

Apart from finding the right documents and sources covering technical advances in astronomy, readers can also learn about the findings and thought processes of other disciplines (philosophy for instance) that are actively examining astronomy and its approaches, as well as plans for journeys to planets like Mercury. The database contains a large selection of free information and articles covering basic issues ranging from "How far is Mercury from earth? " to the composition of Mercury and other planets. The path to the various planets, be it Mars, Pluto or Mercury, is not necessarily light years removed. A visit to innovations-report leads the reader to remote worlds of astronomy, alien planets and galaxies, planets related to Mars and Mercury, through the Milky Way and into black holes. Or simply put, through the entire cosmos of astronomy.

How heavy is Mercury?

Determining the weight of a planet like Mercury would appear to be a difficult undertaking. After all, it's not as simple as placing a planet on a scale, whether it's Mercury or some other planet. Such aspects are nevertheless a part of astronomy. With innovations-report.com, readers can get an exciting look at the world of astronomy, Mercury and other planets. Among other information, you can find reports that explain how researchers go about calculating the weight and dimensions of Mercury and other planets. Astronomy does not involve dreaming. Instead, it has more to do with applying methods and strategies from the field of physics. The distance to the planets is a constant challenge for researchers. Those with an interest in astronomy can rely on innovations-report to discover how scientists tackle these challenges, what knowledge they have gained about planets such as Mercury and the progress toward journeys to other planets.

Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

Latest News:

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Sculpting solar systems: Magnetic fields seen for first time

Astronomers have caught their first glimpse of the invisible magnetic fields that sculpt solar systems.

Looking at a bright, nearby baby star and the dust swirling in its cradle, astronomers from the University of Illinois and six collaborating institutions were...

31.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Here's Looking At You: Spooky Shadow Play Gives Jupiter a Giant Eye

Hubble treats astronomers to gorgeous close-up views of the eerie outer planets. But it's a bit of a trick when it seems like the planet's looking back at you!

This happened on April 21, 2014, when Hubble was being used to monitor changes in Jupiter's immense Great Red Spot (GRS) storm. During the exposures, the...

31.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Hubble Sees 'Ghost Light' From Dead Galaxies

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has picked up the faint, ghostly glow of stars ejected from ancient galaxies that were gravitationally ripped apart several billion years ago. The mayhem happened 4 billion light-years away, inside an immense collection of nearly 500 galaxies nicknamed “Pandora’s Cluster,” also known as Abell 2744.

The scattered stars are no longer bound to any one galaxy, and drift freely between galaxies in the cluster. By observing the light from the orphaned stars,...

31.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Griffith scientists propose existence and interaction of parallel worlds

Griffith University academics are challenging the foundations of quantum science with a radical new theory based on the existence of, and interactions between, parallel universes.

In a paper published in the prestigious journal Physical Review X, Professor Howard Wiseman and Dr Michael Hall from Griffith's Centre for Quantum Dynamics,...

30.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Image From Mars-Orbiting Spectrometer Shows Comet’s Coma

These two infrared images of C/2013 (Comet Siding Spring) were taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) on Oct. 19, 2014.

Comet Siding Spring – an Oort Cloud comet that may contain material from the formation of the solar system some 4.6 billion years ago – was making its first...

29.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Postcards from the plasma edge

For magnetic fusion energy to fuel future power plants, scientists must find ways to control the interactions that take place between the volatile edge of the plasma and the walls that surround it in fusion facilities. Such interactions can profoundly affect conditions at the superhot core of the plasma in ways that include kicking up impurities that cool down the core and halt fusion reactions.

Researchers have improved plasma performance by applying lithium coatings to the walls of fusion facilities. But a complete understanding of the mechanism...

29.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Insights into the physics of space weather that disrupts cell phones and creates Earthly havoc

News from the 2014 APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting

Each second, the sun hurls millions of tons of hot, charged plasma gas into space. This volatile "solar wind" buffets the magnetosphere, the magnetic field...

29.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

NASA’s LRO Spacecraft Captures Images of LADEE’s Impact Crater

NASA’S Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft has spied a new crater on the lunar surface; one made from the impact of NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission.

“The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) team recently developed a new computer tool to search Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) before and after image pairs...

29.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Can the wave function of an electron be divided and trapped?

Electrons are elementary particles — indivisible, unbreakable. But new research suggests the electron's quantum state — the electron wave function — can be separated into many parts. That has some strange implications for the theory of quantum mechanics.

New research by physicists from Brown University puts the profound strangeness of quantum mechanics in a nutshell — or, more accurately, in a helium bubble.

29.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

Syracuse Physicists Closer to Understanding Balance of Matter, Antimatter

Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences have made important discoveries regarding Bs meson particles—something that may explain why the universe contains more matter than antimatter.

Distinguished Professor Sheldon Stone and his colleagues recently announced their findings at a workshop at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Titled “Implications...

28.10.2014 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Lord of the Microrings

Berkeley Lab Reports Breakthrough in Microring Laser Cavities

A significant breakthrough in laser technology has been reported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab)...

Im Focus: Sculpting solar systems: Magnetic fields seen for first time

Astronomers have caught their first glimpse of the invisible magnetic fields that sculpt solar systems.

Looking at a bright, nearby baby star and the dust swirling in its cradle, astronomers from the University of Illinois and six collaborating institutions were...

Im Focus: Diagnosing prostate cancer quickly and safely

Distinguishing between benign and malignant prostate tissue is difficult.

A new device facilitates the diagnosis for doctors: Through a visual analysis, they can reliably determine if they are dealing with carcinoma within a...

Im Focus: Quantum effects bridge the gap

Quantum effects in nanometer-scale metallic structures provide a platform for combining molecular electronics and plasmonics

Plasmonic devices combine the ‘super speed’ of optics with the ‘super small’ of microelectronics. These devices exhibit quantum effects and show promise as...

Im Focus: New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring

In less than a minute, a miniature device developed at the University of Montreal can measure a patient's blood for methotrexate, a commonly used but potentially toxic cancer drug. Just as accurate and ten times less expensive than equipment currently used in hospitals, this nanoscale device has an optical system that can rapidly gauge the optimal dose of methotrexate a patient needs, while minimizing the drug's adverse effects. The research was led by Jean-François Masson and Joelle Pelletier of the university's Department of Chemistry.

Methotrexate has been used for many years to treat certain cancers, among other diseases, because of its ability to block the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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