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Blasting off to Mercury and other planets with astronomy

Man has always been drawn to the discovery of alien worlds and planets. And this urge has reached its zenith thanks to astronomy and travel to alien planets.

Astronomy adds a whole new dimension to the scientific impulse to discover and conquer other planets and systems beyond earth's realm. Astronomy allows scientists to not only carry out earth-based observations of planets such as Mercury. It also provides the basis for the continual discovery of new galaxies and unknown planets. Astronomy has made huge advances, due in part to the exploration of Mercury. innovations-report provides continuous coverage of the general advances being made in astronomy, as well as those specific to the discovery of Mercury, in continuously updated articles and scientific reports about astronomy, Mercury and other planets and galaxies.

Scientific look at Mercury

innovations-report encompasses a comprehensive astronomy database filled with a rich assortment articles and reports on all areas of science, research and innovations. This of course includes a large selection of documents on physics and astronomy. Whether it's achievements in astronomy, the discovery of new planets or progress in the journey to Mercury, innovations-report provides readers all of the latest developments from numerous independent research sources on the subjects of "Mercury", "planets" and general astronomy.

Astronomy - an interdisciplinary field

Apart from finding the right documents and sources covering technical advances in astronomy, readers can also learn about the findings and thought processes of other disciplines (philosophy for instance) that are actively examining astronomy and its approaches, as well as plans for journeys to planets like Mercury. The database contains a large selection of free information and articles covering basic issues ranging from "How far is Mercury from earth? " to the composition of Mercury and other planets. The path to the various planets, be it Mars, Pluto or Mercury, is not necessarily light years removed. A visit to innovations-report leads the reader to remote worlds of astronomy, alien planets and galaxies, planets related to Mars and Mercury, through the Milky Way and into black holes. Or simply put, through the entire cosmos of astronomy.

How heavy is Mercury?

Determining the weight of a planet like Mercury would appear to be a difficult undertaking. After all, it's not as simple as placing a planet on a scale, whether it's Mercury or some other planet. Such aspects are nevertheless a part of astronomy. With innovations-report.com, readers can get an exciting look at the world of astronomy, Mercury and other planets. Among other information, you can find reports that explain how researchers go about calculating the weight and dimensions of Mercury and other planets. Astronomy does not involve dreaming. Instead, it has more to do with applying methods and strategies from the field of physics. The distance to the planets is a constant challenge for researchers. Those with an interest in astronomy can rely on innovations-report to discover how scientists tackle these challenges, what knowledge they have gained about planets such as Mercury and the progress toward journeys to other planets.

Physics and Astronomy

This area deals with the fundamental laws and building blocks of nature and how they interact, the properties and the behavior of matter, and research into space and time and their structures.

innovations-report provides in-depth reports and articles on subjects such as astrophysics, laser technologies, nuclear, quantum, particle and solid-state physics, nanotechnologies, planetary research and findings (Mars, Venus) and developments related to the Hubble Telescope.

Latest News:

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Superconductivity: footballs with no resistance

Indications of light-induced lossless electricity transmission in fullerenes contribute to the search for superconducting materials for practical applications.

Superconductors have long been confined to niche applications, due to the fact that the highest temperature at which even the best of these materials becomes...

09.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

A deep look into a single molecule

A German research group has demonstrated the first implementation of a non-destructive state detection technique for molecular ions. Piet Schmidt and his colleagues from the QUEST-Institute at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) observed changes in the rotational state of a trapped and indirectly cooled molecular ion in real time and in situ. This technique enables novel spectroscopy methods with applications ranging from chemistry to tests of fundamental physics. The results are published in the current issue of “Nature”.

The quantum state of a molecular ion has been measured live and in a non-destructive fashion for the first time

09.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

Tiniest Particles Shrink Before Exploding When Hit With SLAC's X-ray Laser

Unanticipated Response to Intense Laser Light Has Broad Implications for Ultrafast X-ray Science.

Researchers assumed that tiny objects would instantly blow up when hit by extremely intense light from the world's most powerful X-ray laser at the Department...

05.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

Scientists create new state of matter: Quantum gas, liquid and crystal all-in-one

Scientists from the University of Stuttgart (Germany) combinethe properties of gases, crystals and superfluids to a single unique state of matter.

The world of quantum mechanics happens only in small scales around a few nanometers. In this nanoworld, particles can behave like waves, and vice versa and...

02.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

Polar vortices observed in ferroelectric

New state of matter holds promise for ultracompact data storage and processing

The observation in a ferroelectric material of "polar vortices" that appear to be the electrical cousins of magnetic skyrmions holds intriguing possibilities...

01.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

NASA: Understanding the magnetic sun

The surface of the sun writhes and dances. Far from the still, whitish-yellow disk it appears to be from the ground, the sun sports twisting, towering loops and swirling cyclones that reach into the solar upper atmosphere, the million-degree corona - but these cannot be seen in visible light. Then, in the 1950s, we got our first glimpse of this balletic solar material, which emits light only in wavelengths invisible to our eyes.

Once this dynamic system was spotted, the next step was to understand what caused it. For this, scientists have turned to a combination of real time...

01.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating

UNIST research team developed a new simple nanowire manufacturing technique

A team of Korean researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently pioneered in developing a new simple nanowire manufacturing technique that uses self-catalytic...

01.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

Unconventional superconductivity near absolute zero temperature

Researchers at the Goethe University in Frankfurt have discovered an important mechanism for superconductivity in a metallic compound containing ytterbium, rhodium and silicon.

Researchers at the Goethe University have discovered an important mechanism for superconductivity in a metallic compound containing ytterbium, rhodium and...

01.02.2016 | nachricht Read more

Hubble sees monstrous cloud boomerang back to our galaxy

Hubble Space Telescope astronomers are finding that the old adage "what goes up must come down" even applies to an immense cloud of hydrogen gas outside our Milky Way galaxy. The invisible cloud is plummeting toward our galaxy at nearly 700,000 miles per hour.

Though hundreds of enormous, high-velocity gas clouds whiz around the outskirts of our galaxy, this so-called "Smith Cloud" is unique because its trajectory is...

29.01.2016 | nachricht Read more

NASA Webb Telescope mirrors installed with robotic arm precision

Inside a massive clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland the James Webb Space Telescope team is steadily installing the largest space telescope mirror ever. Unlike other space telescope mirrors, this one must be pieced together from segments using a high-precision robotic arm.

The team uses a robotic arm called the Primary Mirror Alignment and Integration Fixture to lift and lower each of Webb's 18 primary flight mirror segments to...

28.01.2016 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New study: How stable is the West Antarctic Ice Sheet?

Exceeding critical temperature limits in the Southern Ocean may cause the collapse of ice sheets and a sharp rise in sea levels

A future warming of the Southern Ocean caused by rising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere may severely disrupt the stability of the West...

Im Focus: Superconductivity: footballs with no resistance

Indications of light-induced lossless electricity transmission in fullerenes contribute to the search for superconducting materials for practical applications.

Superconductors have long been confined to niche applications, due to the fact that the highest temperature at which even the best of these materials becomes...

Im Focus: Wbp2 is a novel deafness gene

Researchers at King’s College London and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the United Kingdom have for the first time demonstrated a direct link between the Wbp2 gene and progressive hearing loss. The scientists report that the loss of Wbp2 expression leads to progressive high-frequency hearing loss in mouse as well as in two clinical cases of children with deafness with no other obvious features. The results are published in EMBO Molecular Medicine.

The scientists have shown that hearing impairment is linked to hormonal signalling rather than to hair cell degeneration. Wbp2 is known as a transcriptional...

Im Focus: From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes

Pollens, the bane of allergy sufferers, could represent a boon for battery makers: Recent research has suggested their potential use as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.

"Our findings have demonstrated that renewable pollens could produce carbon architectures for anode applications in energy storage devices," said Vilas Pol, an...

Im Focus: Automated driving: Steering without limits

OmniSteer project to increase automobiles’ urban maneuverability begins with a € 3.4 million budget

Automobiles increase the mobility of their users. However, their maneuverability is pushed to the limit by cramped inner city conditions. Those who need to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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