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Latest results and studies from the field of medical technology

Medical technology, also referred to as biomedical technology , is engaged in the application of engineering principles and rules to the field of medicine. In the field of medical technology combines engineering know-how and expertise from industry professionals such as physicians and nurses. The objective of medical technology is to optimize medical treatments, as well as therapies, diagnoses and equipment such as ultrasound and MRI, for the benefit of patients. Ongoing research continuously leads to new developments, particularly with medical equipment such as ultrasound and MRI. innovations-report keeps readers up-to-date on these issues by publishing interesting articles and reports on the latest developments in medical technology fields , including ultrasound and MRI systems.

Rapid developments from the field of medical technology

The area of medical technology that involves the development of medical equipment such as MRI, ultrasound and x-ray systems requires continuous research. In order to benefit patients, thelatest technology and engineering developments must be integrated as rapidly as possible into medical systems such as ultrasound and MRI. New developments that are relevant to those who are interested or involved in the field of medical technology occur every day. To keep readers abreast of these issues, innovations-report publishes interesting and easy-to-understand information on developments in medical technology, including systems such as ultrasound and MRI.

innovations-report provides news from the field of medical technology

innovations-report offers readers up-to-date and interesting information from a variety of innovative scientific fields, such as medical technology. The latest research and clinical developments from in medical technology are presented in a clear and easy-to-understand manner, covering topics such as imaging processes, dialysis equipment, ultrasound, cell and tissue engineering, implants, MRI, orthopedic aids, dental materials and surgical technologies.

Maintaining ultrasound and MRI equipment is vitally important

The segment of medical technology that involves maintaining and repairing equipment such as MRI, ultrasound and x-ray is immensely important. If ultrasound or MRI equipment does not function properly, which can lead to false results or therapies, the consequences for patients are unimaginable. And precisely because of its importance, the field of medical technology deserves a great deal of attention. innovations-report covers the key developments in medical equipment technology, including MRI, x-ray and ultrasound systems.

Imaging processes such as ultrasound and MRI

Ultrasound and MRI are two of the most frequently used systems in the field of medical technology. Depending on the type of tissue that needs to be examined, imaging processes such as ultrasound and MRI are carried out either with or without contrast agents. Ultrasound and MRI examinations are performed without ionizing radiation, whereas processes such as computer tomography require ionizing radiation. Basic knowledge of imaging processes such as MRI and ultrasound is essential for anyone involved in the field of medical technology. For these specialists and others who are interested in this area, innovations-report covers the latest research results originating from the field of medical imaging processes such as MRI and ultrasound.

In the field of medical technology, innovations-report covers the latest scientific findings and information related to medical technology, including innovations in the area of medical equipment such as MRI and ultrasound systems.

innovations-report is designed for anyone who wants to keep abreast of developments in the field of medical technology. Here you can find information about the latest innovations in medical imaging processes, including systems such as ultrasound and MRI.

Medical Engineering

The development of medical equipment, products and technical procedures is characterized by high research and development costs in a variety of fields related to the study of human medicine.

innovations-report provides informative and stimulating reports and articles on topics ranging from imaging processes, cell and tissue techniques, optical techniques, implants, orthopedic aids, clinical and medical office equipment, dialysis systems and x-ray/radiation monitoring devices to endoscopy, ultrasound, surgical techniques, and dental materials.

Latest News:

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New imaging technology shown to detect pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes

Non-invasive imaging may help predict type 1 diabetes and response to treatment in humans: Joslin recruiting for new Imaging in Diabetes Clinical Trial A key obstacle to early detection of type 1 diabetes - as well as to rapid assessment of the effectiveness of therapeutic intervention - has been the lack of direct, non-invasive technologies to visualize inflammation in the pancreas, an early manifestation of disease. Instead, clinicians have had to await overt symptoms before 19.08.2005 | nachricht Read more

Hopkins researchers use diffusion MRI technique to monitor ultrasound uterine fibroid treatment

Johns Hopkins researchers have, for what is believed to be the first time, used a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique called diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), a technique that images the movement, or diffusion, of water molecules in tissues, to successfully determine the effectiveness of high-intensity focused ultrasound for treating uterine fibroids. Uterine fibroids are noncancerous tumors that line the uterine wall and can cause intense pain and bleeding. The study appears in the July edi 09.08.2005 | nachricht Read more

Novel technique offers new look at ancient diet dogma

A Penn State researcher is part of the team that developed techniques that have generated insights into dietary divergences between some of our human ancestors, allowing scientists to better understand the evolutionary path that led to the modern-day diets that humans consume. "Our new techniques are allowing us to get beyond simple dichotomies and helping us understand the processes by which dietary evolution is working," said Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology at the University of Arka 05.08.2005 | nachricht Read more

Certolizumab pegol demonstrates positive results in two Phase III Crohn’™s disease trials

UCB today announced positive results for the two pivotal Phase III trials (PRECISE 1 and 2) of certolizumab pegol (CDP870) in the induction and maintenance of clinical response in moderate to severe active Crohn’TMs disease. The PRECiSE trials assessed the safety and efficacy of CIMZIATM compared to placebo over a 26 week period, in a total of 1330 patients with active Crohn’TMs disease. Data from PRECiSE 1 and 2 will be presented in more detail at the major forthcoming gastroent 28.07.2005 | nachricht Read more

MR spectroscopy helps identify cancerous breast tumors

Measuring the biochemical changes in breast tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy enables radiologists to more accurately distinguish benign tumors from cancerous ones, according to a study appearing in the August issue of the journal Radiology. "Adding spectroscopy to breast MR examinations will not only reduce concern over possible missed cancers and unnecessary biopsy procedures, it may also improve the efficiency and quality of patient care," said co-author Si 27.07.2005 | nachricht Read more

Alzheimer’s disease; new approach, new possibilities?

Scientists from the Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB) associated with the University of Antwerp have achieved a new breakthrough in their research on the origins of Alzheimer’s disease. Their alternative approach opens up new prospects for developing a treatment which can slow the disease’s progress. The researchers have shown that ´the plaques´ which form in the brain of patients are linked to damage to nearby blood vessels. Leakage appears to occur between the blood vesse 27.07.2005 | nachricht Read more

Statin therapy may lower mortality in heart failure patients

Cholesterol-lowering statin therapy may improve survival in patients with diastolic heart failure (DHF) according to a paper published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association by cardiologists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Currently, there are no treatments shown to improve survival in these patients, who make up about 40 percent of all heart failure cases. Systolic heart failure patients have hearts that don’t pump out enough blood. I 25.07.2005 | nachricht Read more

Portable molecular detection tool to revolutionise medical diagnosis

A portable, versatile and low-cost molecular detection tool being developed by a team of European researchers promises to revolutionise the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer and open up new applications in sectors as diverse as environmental protection, chemical analysis and food safety. Working in the field of micro- and nano-technologies, the IST programme-funded BioFinger project is due to begin testing its state-of-the-art system over the summer amid expectations for a c 18.07.2005 | nachricht Read more

New gene scanning technology marks a major advance in disease research

Gene scanning techniques developed by Professor Ian Day and colleagues at the University of Southampton are set to have a major impact on healthcare in the future. One of two gene mutation scanning techniques devised by Professor Day and his team in the Human Genetics Division of the University’s School of Medicine has been successfully applied to search for rare genetic mutations in the population at large. Their method, called meltMADGE, which combines thermal ramp el 06.07.2005 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons

The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten...

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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