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Innovations from the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology

Understanding nature and transferring its traits to technology is not only the objective of bionics, but also of marine biology and microbiology.

Bionics, marine biology or microbiology. Here you can find scientific reports and articles about achievements and developments in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Technical research departments at many universities and institutes are examining and learning from nature and then collaborating with the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Although Arnold Gehlen once labeled humanity as a "flawed being" that had to create its own culture to survive nature's environment, we can be certain he had not yet considered the opportunities presented by bionics, marine biology and microbiology. Science is meanwhile using the traits of the flawed being to contemplate how to utilize bionics, marine biology and microbiology to copy animals, plants and the rest of the environment. Because nature features attributes such as the hardest and most durable materials and efficient energy production and conversion, it has become a treasure trove of knowledge for bionics, marine biology and microbiology. As a stand-alone branch of research, science can use bionics to demonstrate that nature is superior to humans in many aspects and that we still have a lot to learn from it, whether in macro or microbiology.

Bionics takes the leap from comics to research

The "Bionic Six" comic and animated television series revolved around a family who collaborated with a researcher to utilize the attributes of nature to combat those intent on destroying it. The "Bionic Six" acquired their power and speed through bionics. They knew how to take advantage of the physical forces of nature and were already advancing into the fields of marine biology and microbiology research. Today, bionics is a well-respected field of research that has little to do with children's entertainment. Bionics occupies itself with nature's "inventions" and works closely with the fields of marine biology and microbiology to transfer their attributes to the human culture. Bionics has already proved its worth in the fields of materials research and nano technology. Bionics and microbiology have also made progress in areas such as energy production and storage.

Marine biology and microbiology - two close partners

Marine biology has enjoyed new impetus over the past several years. Although researchers have long been occupied with both fields, marine biology and microbiology were thrust into the public spotlight no later than with the publication of "The Swarm", a novel by German author Frank Schätzing. Over the last year, marine biology and microbiology reports revealed that although scientists have unearthed a wealth of new discoveries in marine biology and microbiology, there remain thousands of undiscovered animal species in both areas. Microbiology is actually a vital part of marine biology since the ocean depths contain not only large animals, but also organisms that cannot be seen with the naked eye. And this is where microbiology comes into play. Marine biology and microbiology are engaged in examining the effects of currents, depths and temperatures on the development and propagation of organisms and animals. For this reason, marine biology and microbiology researchers are working to discover new animal species and organisms, all the while further expanding the depths of geography and science. When marine biology and microbiology come together with bionics, this can result in unimagined discoveries and thus the development of new methods that humans can implement for their own benefit and for the protection of the environment. The latest achievements in the fields of bionics, marine biology and microbiology can be found in innovations-report.

Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Latest News:

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Regulating human X chromosomes doesn’t use same gene as in mouse

A gene thought to keep a single X chromosome turned on in mice plays no such role in humans, Johns Hopkins researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. The finding is likely to relegate the disproven gene to relative obscurity, at least in humans, says Barbara Migeon, M.D., of the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, whose laboratory found the human version of the gene in 2001. It also moves the search for the gene from the X chromosome to the 01.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

New Gene Discovered for Male Fertility in Plants

A new gene shown to be essential for pollen production in flowering plants has been discovered by scientists at Penn State University. A paper describing the team’s discovery of the gene, whose activity they found is necessary for the formation of cells required for pollen production, will be published in the 1 August 2002 issue of the journal Genes and Development. "This research is the first indication that a specific kind of protein known as a receptor-linked protein kinase, which resul 01.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

New insight into how eyes become wired to the brain discovered by Salk, UT Southwestern scientists

A crucial piece of the puzzle into how the eye becomes wired to the brain has been revealed by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., and UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. In findings published in today’s edition of Neuron, the researchers report that a certain class of Eph receptors and ephrin ligands - proteins that cause cells to either repel or attract each other - control how nerve connections from the developing eye form maps that pre 01.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

What inspires yeast cells to divide?

Rockefeller researchers discover unexpected trigger Often in science a novel set of experiments comes along that forces researchers to abandon old models in exchange for new ones that better fit their observations. This is the case in a new Nature report by Rockefeller University researchers, which finds that past models of cellular division in the simple yeast organism were focused on the wrong protein. Until now, scientists thought that yeast cells began dividing into two 01.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

Researchers discover new insight into a common signaling pathway

Scientists have identified a key regulatory mechanism in the TGF-ß pathway. This discovery by Dr. Kai Lin and colleagues at UMASS Medical School and the University of Mississippi Medical Center helps further our understanding of how this important signaling pathway functions in a variety of cellular processes, including cancer formation and embryonic development. The work is published in the August 1 issue of Genes & Development. The TGF-ß pathway is an intracellular signaling pat 01.08.2002 | nachricht Read more

Wild plant or food plant?

Fruit rinds provide new clues about crop domestication Distinctly sculptured opaline phytoliths in soil and plant remains tell archaeologists which plants were present thousands of years ago. However, the production and purpose of these tiny glassy structures common in plant tissues is poorly understood. Dolores Piperno at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama and colleagues predict that a single genetic locus controls both lignin and phytolith production in sq 31.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Adult stem cells selectively delivered into the eye and used to control angiogenesis at TSRI

A team of researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has discovered a way to use adult bone marrow stem cells to form new blood vessels in the eye or to deliver chemicals that will prevent the abnormal formation of new vessels. This technique, which involves injecting the stem cells into the eye, could potentially be used to stimulate vessel growth and address inherited degenerations of the retina in the first instance, and in the second, to treat ocular diseases resulting from 30.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Carbon nanotubes found to fluoresce

Optical properties could prove useful in biomedical, nanoelectronic applications Add fluorescence to the growing list of unique physical properties associated with carbon nanotubes -- the ultrasmall, ultrastrong wunderkind of the fullerene family of carbon molecules. In research detailed in the current issue of Science magazine, a team of Rice University chemists led by fullerene discoverer and Nobel laureate Richard Smalley describes the first observations of fluorescence 30.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

UK scientists crack lobster shell colour puzzle

UK researchers announced a first this week when they reported their discovery of how lobsters change colour from the blue-purple of their ocean-floor camouflage to the distinctive orange-red when cooked. Writing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, scientists from Imperial College London, University of Manchester, Daresbury Laboratory and Royal Holloway, University of London describe how they have solved the structure of a key part of the lobster shell protein, Beta 29.07.2002 | nachricht Read more

Bacteria Precipitate Gold

Roman A. Amosov and a team of Russian scientists from the Central Institute for Geological Exploration of Non-ferrous and Noble Metals, Institute of Paleontology, Russian Academy of Sciences, and from the Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, led by, have managed to simulate in the laboratory the process of precipitation of gold which in the natural geothermal wells is promoted by blue-green algae (cyanobacteriae). For the purposes of the experiment Vladimir Orleans 29.07.2002 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers Discover New Anti-Cancer Protein

An international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers led by Prof. Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, report in “Nature” that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.

The incidence of liver cancer, also known as hepatocellular carcinoma, is steadily increasing. In the last twenty years, the number of cases has almost doubled...

Im Focus: Researchers at Fraunhofer monitor re-entry of Chinese space station Tiangong-1

In just a few weeks from now, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere where it will to a large extent burn up. It is possible that some debris will reach the Earth's surface. Tiangong-1 is orbiting the Earth uncontrolled at a speed of approx. 29,000 km/h.Currently the prognosis relating to the time of impact currently lies within a window of several days. The scientists at Fraunhofer FHR have already been monitoring Tiangong-1 for a number of weeks with their TIRA system, one of the most powerful space observation radars in the world, with a view to supporting the German Space Situational Awareness Center and the ESA with their re-entry forecasts.

Following the loss of radio contact with Tiangong-1 in 2016 and due to the low orbital height, it is now inevitable that the Chinese space station will...

Im Focus: Alliance „OLED Licht Forum“ – Key partner for OLED lighting solutions

Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, provider of research and development services for OLED lighting solutions, announces the founding of the “OLED Licht Forum” and presents latest OLED design and lighting solutions during light+building, from March 18th – 23rd, 2018 in Frankfurt a.M./Germany, at booth no. F91 in Hall 4.0.

They are united in their passion for OLED (organic light emitting diodes) lighting with all of its unique facets and application possibilities. Thus experts in...

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



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