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Between atmosphere and stratosphere: interdisciplinary research is gaining momentum

One of today's most pressing research challenges, which has huge significance for future generations, is the impact of the human overcivilization of the atmosphere and stratosphere. The survival of the blue planet will depend on how research deals with this conflict.

Researchers warn that the atmosphere and stratosphere are striking back.

Solar radiation and vapor content in the atmosphere and stratosphere determine the climate and the weather. The natural greenhouse effect created by carbon dioxide is a long-term cyclic process that has had a regulative function with respect to the geological development of the earth. Thegreenhouse gases in the atmosphere and stratosphere , which have drastically increased over the last 100 years, is a homemade problem. Research on the atmosphere and stratosphere leads scientists to believe this development will result in a dramatic climate change by accelerating the on-going process. Damage to the earth's ozone layer in the stratosphere further aggravates the situation according to researchers. The atmosphere and stratosphere are taking the brunt of the effects of human overcivilization. Researchers sum it up by suggesting that in turn, mankind is paying the price for what is does to the atmosphere and stratosphere.

The earth's atmosphere - as critical as the air we breathe

The atmosphere, a gaseous shell that envelops the earth's surface, consists of several layers. The atmosphere equates to a gas mixture made chiefly of oxygen and nitrogen and is normally referred to as air. Argon, neon, helium, krypton and xenon are present in small quantities, in addition to trace gases and aerosols in in varying quantities. When the earth was created around 4.56 billion years ago, oxygen played no role in the atmosphere and stratosphere. Over the course of the chemical evolution, it first made life on earth possible roughly 350 million years ago.

Can research control the looming menace?

Hardly any other branch of scientific research has gained more momentum over the past decades than research into the causes of climate events in the atmosphere and stratosphere . Findings raise the hope that mankind will contemplate and rethink the issue and eventually develop effective instruments to combat the growing danger to the atmosphere and stratosphere. Parallel to global efforts, researchers are striving to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through targeted measures that can stem climate change, and this has a direct impact on discussions surrounding the atmosphere and stratosphere.

How will mankind deal with the technological innovations created through research , which would be experienced very differently on a regional basis? Are humans willing to protect the atmosphere and stratosphere by investing in future technologies that won't be effective until further generations? How much will humans be willing to accept when it comes to research into the atmosphere and stratosphere?

The atmosphere and stratosphere will remain the focus of interdisciplinary research

Against the backdrop of a world that is politically and economically linked, discussions regarding the atmosphere and stratosphere have a global dimension. The research issues related to changes in the atmosphere and stratosphere have long been more than just scientific. What would a society look like in which the atmosphere and stratosphere are progressing toward conditions that make life on earth unsustainable or at least where vital aspects of the environment are seriously impacted? How far is the human species willing to transform itself and how quickly can man and science develop measures to tackle changes to the atmosphere and stratosphere?

Research will be tasked with laying the foundation for humans with the will to change.

Interdisciplinary Research

News and developments from the field of interdisciplinary research.

Among other topics, you can find stimulating reports and articles related to microsystems, emotions research, futures research and stratospheric research.

Latest News:

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Robot researcher combines nature to nurture ‘superhuman’ navigation

Computer modelling of the human eye, the brain of a rat and a robot could revolutionise advances in neuroscience and new technology, says a QUT leading robotics researcher.

Dr Michael Milford from QUT's Science and Engineering Faculty says the new study uses new computer algorithms to enable robots to navigate intelligently,...

01.10.2014 | nachricht Read more

The mechanics of tissue growth

Pitt, Carnegie Mellon engineers combine mechanics with biology to make key discovery about communication between cells.

When the body forms new tissues during the healing process, cells must be able to communicate with each other. For years, scientists believed this...

24.09.2014 | nachricht Read more

Lego-like modular components make building 3-D 'labs-on-a-chip' a snap

Newly developed modular components take microfluidic system construction from flat to 3-D and make it cheap, quick and easy

Thanks to new LEGO®-like components developed by researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, it is now possible to build a 3-D microfluidic system...

23.09.2014 | nachricht Read more

Nature’s designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Seashells and electromagnetic waves, spiders and the structure of color connect in optics and photonics studies

"Nature has developed, very cleverly, some lessons on how to create the features that we desire in optical design," said Joseph Shaw, director of the Optical...

18.09.2014 | nachricht Read more

Urban Design With Emotions

Research project develops unique methods to use emotions in urban planning

Unsafe bike paths, traffic jam stress, frightening underpasses – modern city dwellers face a number of stressors. According to experts, sustainable urban...

17.09.2014 | nachricht Read more

'Robo Brain' will teach robots everything from the Internet

Robo Brain – a large-scale computational system that learns from publicly available Internet resources – is currently downloading and processing about 1 billion images, 120,000 YouTube videos, and 100 million how-to documents and appliance manuals. The information is being translated and stored in a robot-friendly format that robots will be able to draw on when they need it.

To serve as helpers in our homes, offices and factories, robots will need to understand how the world works and how the humans around them behave.

25.08.2014 | nachricht Read more

“Wetting” a Battery’s Appetite for Renewable Energy Storage

New liquid alloy electrode improves sodium-beta battery performance

Sun, wind and other renewable energy sources could make up a larger portion of the electricity America consumes if better batteries could be built to store the...

04.08.2014 | nachricht Read more

Singapore scientists discover genetic cause of common breast tumours in women

Multi-disciplinary research team discovers that a gene known as MED12 is altered in nearly 60 percent of fibroadenomas

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Singapore General Hospital...

21.07.2014 | nachricht Read more

Researchers demonstrate novel, tunable nanoantennas

An interdisciplinary research team at the University of Illinois has developed a novel, tunable nanoantenna that paves the way for new kinds of plasmonic-based optomechanical systems whereby plasmonic field enhancement can actuate mechanical motion.

Recently, there has been a lot of interest in fabricating metal-based nanotextured surfaces that are pre-programmed to alter the properties of light in a...
15.07.2014 | nachricht Read more

Climate engineering can't erase climate change

Tinkering with climate change through climate engineering isn't going to help us get around what we have to do says a new report authored by researchers at six universities, including Simon Fraser University.

After evaluating a range of possible climate-altering approaches to dissipating greenhouse gases and reducing warming, the interdisciplinary team concluded...

04.06.2014 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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