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Between atmosphere and stratosphere: interdisciplinary research is gaining momentum

One of today's most pressing research challenges, which has huge significance for future generations, is the impact of the human overcivilization of the atmosphere and stratosphere. The survival of the blue planet will depend on how research deals with this conflict.

Researchers warn that the atmosphere and stratosphere are striking back.

Solar radiation and vapor content in the atmosphere and stratosphere determine the climate and the weather. The natural greenhouse effect created by carbon dioxide is a long-term cyclic process that has had a regulative function with respect to the geological development of the earth. Thegreenhouse gases in the atmosphere and stratosphere , which have drastically increased over the last 100 years, is a homemade problem. Research on the atmosphere and stratosphere leads scientists to believe this development will result in a dramatic climate change by accelerating the on-going process. Damage to the earth's ozone layer in the stratosphere further aggravates the situation according to researchers. The atmosphere and stratosphere are taking the brunt of the effects of human overcivilization. Researchers sum it up by suggesting that in turn, mankind is paying the price for what is does to the atmosphere and stratosphere.

The earth's atmosphere - as critical as the air we breathe

The atmosphere, a gaseous shell that envelops the earth's surface, consists of several layers. The atmosphere equates to a gas mixture made chiefly of oxygen and nitrogen and is normally referred to as air. Argon, neon, helium, krypton and xenon are present in small quantities, in addition to trace gases and aerosols in in varying quantities. When the earth was created around 4.56 billion years ago, oxygen played no role in the atmosphere and stratosphere. Over the course of the chemical evolution, it first made life on earth possible roughly 350 million years ago.

Can research control the looming menace?

Hardly any other branch of scientific research has gained more momentum over the past decades than research into the causes of climate events in the atmosphere and stratosphere . Findings raise the hope that mankind will contemplate and rethink the issue and eventually develop effective instruments to combat the growing danger to the atmosphere and stratosphere. Parallel to global efforts, researchers are striving to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through targeted measures that can stem climate change, and this has a direct impact on discussions surrounding the atmosphere and stratosphere.

How will mankind deal with the technological innovations created through research , which would be experienced very differently on a regional basis? Are humans willing to protect the atmosphere and stratosphere by investing in future technologies that won't be effective until further generations? How much will humans be willing to accept when it comes to research into the atmosphere and stratosphere?

The atmosphere and stratosphere will remain the focus of interdisciplinary research

Against the backdrop of a world that is politically and economically linked, discussions regarding the atmosphere and stratosphere have a global dimension. The research issues related to changes in the atmosphere and stratosphere have long been more than just scientific. What would a society look like in which the atmosphere and stratosphere are progressing toward conditions that make life on earth unsustainable or at least where vital aspects of the environment are seriously impacted? How far is the human species willing to transform itself and how quickly can man and science develop measures to tackle changes to the atmosphere and stratosphere?

Research will be tasked with laying the foundation for humans with the will to change.

Interdisciplinary Research

News and developments from the field of interdisciplinary research.

Among other topics, you can find stimulating reports and articles related to microsystems, emotions research, futures research and stratospheric research.

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Eddies Warm Up The Ocean

Eddies appear in the ocean like in the atmosphere. Atmospheric eddies are short-lived, extremely speedy, and often very hazardous. Oceanic eddies are slower and can be observed only with the use of special equipment, but these eddies gently mixing ocean waters affect the climate in general. For more than ten years specialists from the Pacific Institute of Oceanology in Vladivostok have observed the oceanic eddies formed at the confluence of two largest undercurrents in the west of the Pacif 20.02.2002 | nachricht Read more

New Research Shows Just How Much We Hate Winners

New research by economists at the Universities of Warwick and Oxford has provided surprising information on just how much people hate a winner. It also shows what lengths human beings are prepared to go to damage a winner out of a sense of envy or fairness. The researchers, Professor Andrew Oswald of the University of Warwick and Dr Daniel Zizzo of Oxford, designed a new kind of experiment, played with real cash, where subjects could anonymously “burn” away other people’s money - but only a 12.02.2002 | nachricht Read more

Stratified seawater disrupts the transport of imposex substances

Researchers from the University of Amsterdam have demonstrated that the climate in South Mexico changed following the collapse of the Maya empire. From preserved pollen grains the paleoecologists could deduce that the climate quickly became dryer. The climate becoming dryer, explains the decrease in the population following the collapse of the Maya empire. The climate researchers have therefore helped to solve an archaeological mystery. With the help of pollen grains, the paleoecologis 25.01.2002 | nachricht Read more

Algae is the key to unlock billion dollar industries

Some of the world’s leading scientists are rubbing shoulders with experts at the University of Abertay Dundee to study tiny plant-like organisms that could unlock billion dollar industries for Europe. Representatives from famous European universities and research centres, including the renowned Pasteur Institute in Paris and the Czech Academy of Sciences, are putting algae under the microscope in a project considered so important by the EU that it has been given a 1.75m Euro grant (around £1 24.01.2002 | nachricht Read more

Help for names’ sakes

Shared names prompt good deeds. When seeking help from a stranger, ask someone who shares your name: people are more likely to assist a namesake, an e-mail study has revealed 1 . A shared name indicates two people are likely to share genes, so evolution may have taught us to be nice to our namesakes, suggests psychologist Margo Wilson who carried out the study at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Unusual names are particularly good a 15.01.2002 | nachricht Read more

CORDIS offers new service on the future of European research

CORDIS, the European Commission`s Research and Development Information Service, is offering a new online service dedicated to science and technology foresight and the future of European research. The service is part of the re-launch of a redesigned and upgraded CORDIS `Research beyond 2002` site to reflect the latest developments on both the European research area (ERA) and the Sixth Framework programme (FP6). Technology Foresight The new service provides information on res 14.01.2002 | nachricht Read more

Ancestors skip adolescence

Dental diary of a teenage hominid aged 1.5 million years. Our early ancestors never went through the awkward age, suggests a new analysis of dental records. Extended youth may have emerged relatively late in human evolution. Although apes cut the apron strings at around 12 years, despairing human parents are well aware that their kids take at least 18 years to grow up. The development of this prolonged growth period is seen as a key event in human evolution, allowing extra ti 06.12.2001 | nachricht Read more

Global goal frenzy

It’s official: English football teams score fewer goals. Soccer teams worldwide are scoring more goals than they ought to be, whereas English teams seem to follow statistical expectations. The news may delight fans outside England, but it is puzzling the physicists who have found that the chance of a high-scoring game is significantly greater than it may first appear 1 . John Greenhough and colleagues at Warwick University in Coventry, England, analysed the s 28.11.2001 | nachricht Read more

Stiff challenge to instability

The secret of a steady hand is tightening the right muscles. Controlling the stiffness of some of our muscles lets us manage tricky feats of manipulation, such as keeping a screwdriver in a screw, researchers have found 1 . We tune the stiffness to oppose motions in the direction of instability, such as the sideways slips that would let the screwdriver slide out of the slot. Although demanding on the brain, this is the most energy-efficient strategy, say Mitsu 22.11.2001 | nachricht Read more

Ancient Bone Tools Suggest Modern Human Behavior Has African Roots

It’s an enduring enigma in paleoanthropology: when and where did modern human behavior arise? The fossil record suggests that anatomically modern humans appeared in Africa sometime between 150,000 and 100,000 years ago. Yet the earliest convincing indications of behavioral modernity in our species, archaeologists have argued, date to tens of thousands of years later and have turned up in Europe, not Africa. With that in mind, some theorists posited that modern behavior blossomed late and rather sudd 09.11.2001 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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