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Surface-modified nanoparticles endow coatings with combined properties


Nanoparticles are specifically adapted to the particular application by Small Molecule Surface Modification (SMSM). Thereby surfaces of workpieces or mouldings are expected to exhibit several different functions at one and the same time.

Fabricators and processors alike demand consistently high quality for their intermediate and final products. The properties of these goods usually also have to meet specific requirements. Particularly the surfaces of workpieces or mouldings are expected to exhibit several different functions at one and the same time, depending on the industry.

Robustness, unchanging appearance, mar resistance, impact resistance or UV stability may be required, for instance. The INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials uses nanoparticles as design element for such multifunctional coatings. These nanoparticles are specifically adapted to the particular application by Small Molecule Surface Modification (SMSM).

How this approach can be used to produce custom-tailored coatings will be demonstrated by INM at this year’s Hannover Fair from 13 to 17 April as an exhibitor at the leading Research & Technology trade fair (stand B46 in hall 2).

Depending on which property is desired, the nanoparticles used can be surface modified with organic moieties. Small Molecule Surface Modification (SMSM) bestows specific combinations of desired properties, for example hydrophilic, hydrophobic, adhesive, anti-adhesive, acidic, basic, inert or polymerizable.

Nanoparticles thus modified are used to develop nanocomposites: they combine the physical solid-state properties of e.g. ceramics or semiconductors with classic polymer-processing technology. Titanium dioxide, barium titanate, indium-tin oxide or zirconium dioxide, for instance, are used as nanoparticles. In addition to the chemical intrinsic composition of the nanoparticles and their SMSM surface treatment, the properties that are attainable for the desired coatings also vary with the size and dispersal mode of the nanoparticles.

INM’s composite systems are produced via wet-chemical processes. The modified nanoparticles and additives combine with a polymer matrix (an epoxy resin, an acrylate, a polyimide for example) or a hybrid matrix (organic-inorganic) to produce a coatable Nanomer® composite system.

“The modular principle makes it possible to achieve a number of properties at one and the same time in one material,” explains Carsten Becker-Willinger, head of the program division Nanomers, “it helps us to respond in a highly systematic way to the different needs of industry,” the chemist summarizes the potential of nanocomposite technology.

Your expert at the INM:
Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Nanomers
Phone: +49681-9300-196

Your contacts at the stand B46 in hall 2:
Dr. Sabine Schmitz-Stöwe
Dr.Marlon Jochum

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological systems and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbrücken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 210 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

Dr. Carola Jung | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

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