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Siemens to present new generation of controllers for traffic management

25.03.2014
  • New technology increases availability and safety
  • For the first time ever, functional upgrades and controller updates are possible without disrupting ongoing operations
  • Intuitive controller configuration significantly simplified thanks to intelligent software
  • Access and operation via Internet browser, tablet or smartphone based on the latest HTML 5 technology
  • Part of a Web-based all-in-one solution from Siemens

The more complex traffic situations are at urban intersections, the greater the need for more intelligent control solutions. At Intertraffic Amsterdam 2014, scheduled for March 25 to 28, Siemens will be presenting a new generation of controllers for traffic lights and detectors at the unveiling of Sitraffic sX. Downtimes are reduced and intersection safety increased thanks to brand-new developments in hardware and software.


For the very first time, the new Siemens technology allows operators to extend the functions of controllers already deployed in the field by means of remote updates. There is no longer any need to interrupt ongoing operations. This is made possible by an additional real-time processor that can take over control of a set of traffic lights if required. Dangerous "lights out" situations are prevented and the dangerous traffic conditions minimised. Remote maintenance can also be carried out without shutting down the system and also reduces time-consuming on-site call-outs.

The new Sitraffic smartCore configuration software allows efficient data provision for the sX controller and is easy to use and configure. Using Sitraffic Canto and the new plug & play functionality makes the new sX controller much quicker to commission; it also provides a link to the Siemens traffic control centers. Intuitive user guidance and integrated logic, which can also be used to create traffic-actuated signal programs, reduces the workload involved in testing and programming and automatically leads to an efficient signal program for controlling traffic flows.

The new Sitraffic sX generation of controllers is internationally compatible and can be extended by adding new modules. Sitraffic sX can be deployed as a stand-alone device with a low-cost virtual traffic management solution or for comprehensively optimised and coordinated traffic control systems. The controller hardware represents a brand new development that can be installed with little cabling work. It can be extended up to 64 signal groups and 250 detectors. A new 230-volt low-power lamp switch for LED signal heads up to five watts ensures a particularly high level of energy efficiency and satisfies the most stringent requirements demanded for safety in road traffic (SIL 3).

Sitraffic smartGuard is the virtual control room for the Siemens controller

The Sitraffic sX is part of a Web-based, scalable Sitraffic family with which even smaller towns can realise efficient traffic control. Sitraffic smartGuard is the first Web-based traffic control center with a TÜV safety certificate, so towns using this system do not have to invest in their own local traffic control center. The key functions of a traffic computer can be used via a Web-based service platform. The town's traffic managers can access a central traffic management system via Siemens' privately operated cloud to efficiently control and manage their electronic traffic systems. Besides saving on hardware, our customers also benefit from the fact that they can log in at any time from anywhere in the world via PC, tablet or smartphone. A multi-stage security procedure including Siemens' own Sitraffic Canto interface and a TÜV-certified IT security concept ensures that only authorised persons receive access to data.

The Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector (Munich, Germany), with approximately 90,000 employees, focuses on sustainable and intelligent infrastructure technologies. Its offering includes products, systems and solutions for intelligent traffic management, rail-bound transportation, smart grids, power distribution, energy efficient buildings, and safety and security. The Sector comprises the divisions Building Technologies, Low and Medium Voltage, Mobility and Logistics, Rail Systems and Smart Grid. For more information visit http://www.siemens.com/infrastructure-cities

The Siemens Mobility and Logistics Division (Munich, Germany) is a leading international provider of integrated technologies that enable people and goods to be transported in an efficient, safe and environmentally-friendly manner. The areas covered include rail automation, intelligent traffic and transportation systems, and logistics solutions for airports, postal and parcel business. Through its portfolio the Division combines innovations with comprehensive industry know-how in its products, services and IT-based solutions. Further information can be found at: http://www.siemens.com/mobility-logistics/

Reference Number: ICMOL20140308e

Contact

Ms. Silke Reh
Mobility and Logistics Division

Siemens AG

Otto-Hahn-Ring 6

81739  Munich

Germany

Tel: +49 (89) 636-630368

Silke Reh | Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector

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