Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Robots with Emotions on Display at the ICT'08 Event in Lyon

21.11.2008
Robots that develop and display emotions as they interact with humans, and become attached to them, will be exhibited at the ICT’08 event organized by the European Commission in Lyon next week.

Dr Lola Cañamero, of the University of Hertfordshire’s School of Computer Science, is co-ordinating a European project which is developing robots that are capable of growing emotionally, responding to humans and of expressing their own emotional states as they interact with people.

Prototypes of some of these robots showing mid-term project results will be exhibited at ICT 2008, Europe's leading information and communication technologies event, which will take place in Lyon from 25-27 November 2008.

The project, FEELIX GROWING (FEEL, Interact, eXpress: a Global approach to development With Interdisciplinary Grounding; (http://www.feelix-growing.org), funded by the Sixth Framework Programme of the European Commission, aims to develop autonomous robots which will be capable of interacting with humans in everyday environments, and will learn and develop emotionally, socially and cognitively in accordance with the needs and personalities of the individuals with which they associate.

“The aim is to develop robots that grow up and adapt to humans in
everyday environments,” said Dr Cañamero. “If robots are to be truly
integrated in humans’ everyday lives as companions or carers, they cannot
be just taken off the shelf and put into a real-life setting, they need
to live and grow interacting with humans, to adapt to their environment.”
At ICT 2008, Dr Cañamero and the project’s international team of researchers will explain and demonstrate this approach using live interactive demonstrations and videos. Live demonstrations will include a baby pet robot learning to control its stress as it explores a new environment helped by a human caregiver, several robotic heads that show facial emotional responses to humans’ faces and voices, humanoid robots that learn to execute simple tasks by observing and imitating humans, and an interactive floor that responds to human touch and movement with different light and sound patterns. Videos and demonstrations will also show how non-human primates (chimpanzees) react to some of these robots.
The other players in the FEELIX GROWING project are: Centre National de
la Recherche Scientifique, France; Université de Cergy Pontoise, France;
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland; University of
Portsmouth, UK; Institute of Communication and Computer Systems, Greece;
Entertainment Robotics, Denmark; and SAS Aldebaran Robotics, France.

Emma Roberts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.herts.ac.uk

Further reports about: Commission ICT Robotic Robots Robots with Emotions emotions non-human primates prototypes

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Bug-proof communication with entangled photons
22.06.2017 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

nachricht LZH at the LASER World of Photonics 2017: Light for Innovation
16.06.2017 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Chances to treat childhood dementia

24.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Improved Performance thanks to Reduced Weight

24.07.2017 | Automotive Engineering

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>