Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Quality control in the manufacturing cycle

07.05.2013
Even the minutest deviations are detected: Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Factory Operation and Automation IFF have created the “Wheelinspector”, an in-line compatible system for 100 percent inspection of vehicle wheels without contact. The experts will be presenting this and other systems at Control 2013 (Hall 1, Booth 1502) in Stuttgart on May 14 to 17.

Up to eighty geometric features, such as radial and axial runout, width and diameter, relevant to vehicles wheels’ function are inspected before they are launched on the market.


The “Wheelinspector” makes non-contact measurement of light-alloy wheels directly in the production process possible for the first time. © Fraunhofer IFF

These have usually been inspected randomly with tactile measurement and under laboratory conditions away from the production line – for instance, in a room adjacent to the production floor. The procedure takes up to approximately forty-five to sixty minutes per wheel, thus making it impossible to inspect 100 percent of the wheels produced. Defects and their causes are detected and rectified only with some delay.

Together with its industry partner Ascona GmbH, a specialist for optical profile measurement systems headquartered in Meckenbeuren in the Lake Constance district, Fraunhofer experts developed the “Wheelinspector”. “The system makes fully optical, non-contact measurement of light-alloy wheels directly in the production process possible for the first time,” explains Ralf Warnemünde, Deputy Manager of the Measurement and Testing Technology Business Unit at the Fraunhofer IFF. “Immediately after they have been machined, that is, turned, milled and drilled, the new 3D laser technology compares real finished products with their digital model. It scans a multitude of geometric parameters and, with a cycle time of twenty seconds to inspect one wheel, can be integrated fully in the production flow.” The measurement system does more than just assure quality: A manufacturing unit can respond to deviations from process parameters without delay and thus organize production processes far more cost effectively.

The basis of the system is the OptoInspect 3D technology developed at the Fraunhofer IFF, which operates with triangulation that measures points and lines. The system uses a laser light projection. A camera registers the light of the projection reflected diffusely by the part. On the basis of the perspective, the laser projection in the camera image changes according to the wheel’s shape.

The “Wheelinspector” measurement system consists of four sensors and a complex system of axes for moving and positioning the sensors during measurement. This guarantees high flexibility; the system can inspect a wide variety of products in the same machine – even when regularly switching between different types of wheels.
Inspection proceeds thusly: Wheels are rolled into the measuring unit on a conveyer, are centered and locked in place mechanically. An image-based identification system upstream recognizes the particular type of wheel and transmits specific features, such as diameter, width or offset, to the measuring unit. These coordinates are used to align each of the positioning axes of the sensors to their correct position. The sensor cluster revolves around the wheel 360 degrees and scans the measured values. The entire scanning cycle for one wheel is completed after approximately twenty seconds.

The system compares the results of 3D measurements with the tolerances from the 3D CAD model of the vehicle wheel. Deviations of parts resulting from tool wear or breakage are reported to the machines immediately. This prevents serial defects and resulting costs.

The “Wheelinspector” is already being used successfully in the automotive supplier industry. Attendees of Control 2013 will be able to see how the technology works live: The Fraunhofer Vision Alliance will be presenting a wheel inspection system together with the “Wheelinspector” at the trade fair in Stuttgart.

United under the theme “3D Image Processing for Industrial Quality Assurance”, the sixteen institutes involved will be displaying other highlights such as visualization software for 3D terahertz data, which makes the invisible visible.

René Maresch | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.iff.fraunhofer.de/en/business-units/measurement-testing-technology/optical-measurement-car-wheel.html

Further reports about: IFF OptoInspect 3D production process

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht OLEDs applied to paper-thin stainless steel
21.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht New VDI standards established for cleanroom technology
11.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnik und Automatisierung IPA

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA'S OSIRIS-REx spacecraft slingshots past Earth

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer

25.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>