Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New two-armed robot system for bin picking

27.03.2014

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a new automated feeding system for the robotic sorting of parts. What’s new?

The system has two arms. Using the “bp3™” software for bin picking developed by Fraunhofer IPA, the system is capable of detecting and localizing objects, computing the appropriate grasping points and planning how to remove the part from the bin without collision.

New two-armed robot system for bin picking

New two-armed robot system for fast bin picking.

source: Fraunhofer IPA

The two-armed robot can alternately pick components from the bin and, if necessary, even grip and put them down accurately with its second arm. This allows cycle times to be significantly reduced. At Automatica 2014, scientists from Fraunhofer IPA will demonstrate how to pick components quickly and safely from a bin.

Custom-made consumer goods, falling product lifetimes and short development cycles: the challenges facing manufacturing industry are considerable. At present, bulk parts in bins are mostly unloaded by hand or sorted by machine. This leads to physical stress on employees and high costs for different workpiece-holding fixtures.

In addition, mechanized sorting using vibratory bowls or conveyors is usually suitable only for small parts and is not very flexible. Therefore, to reduce cycle times, to increase the degree of automation and thus to safeguard their competitiveness, many customers have expressed a wish for versatile sorting robots: fast, flexible and reliable, they relieve the pressure on employees while at the same time cutting costs. 

Scientists from Fraunhofer IPA have developed a new automated sorting and feeding system that meets these requirements. What’s new about the robot system? It has two arms. “A key advantage of the two-armed robot is that it can grasp and remove chaotically arranged parts alternately and therefore faster from the bin.

This allows companies to employ bin picking e.g. also for the feeding of small parts, an area where it has conventionally often been impossible to achieve the required cycle times,” explains Felix Spenrath, Project Manager in the Robot and Assistive Systems department. “Taking the example of picking components from small load carriers, at Automatica 2014 we will for the first time demonstrate how the new two-armed feeding system works,” says Spenrath.

Collision-free and safe path planning

The “bp3TM” software developed at Fraunhofer IPA stands for the already proven BinPicking3d. Picking is planned using a stationary or robot-controlled 3D sensor, the software allowing automated bin picking by robots or other handling kinematics for any application. In less than a second, the 3D sensor is able to capture the situation in the bin and to localize components in the bin. Next, the system computes which component can be removed without the gripper colliding with the edge of the bin or with other objects. Simulation of the picking process makes a key contribution to the high reliability of the system as a whole.

The “bp3TM” software offers a number of advantages: it is compatible with several sensor types and robots and can be used for different component geometries. “In its simplest version, the software system is preconfigured for the application by Fraunhofer IPA. Experienced users and system integrators have the option of themselves expanding the system at little cost to handle new components and adapting it to meet new situations,” says Spenrath. The system is also user-friendly. After just a short period of training, users are able to work with the system without problem. In addition, the system can be quickly taught to handle new components.

More at Automatica – 6th International Trade Fair for Automation and Mechatronics
3 to 6 June 2014
New Trade Fair Centre Munich
Hall A4 | Stand 530

Contact
Dipl.-Inf. Felix Spenrath, phone +49 711 970-1037, felix.spenrath@ipa.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.automatica-munich.com
http://www.ipa.fraunhofer.de

Jörg Walz | Fraunhofer-Institut

Further reports about: Automatisierung IPA Produktionstechnik Trade collision cycles employees sorting

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Heraeus presents new technologies for foldable touch panels at Touch Taiwan Exhibition
28.07.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

nachricht New MAX Infrared Oven is Five Times Faster For Glass Tempering
08.07.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Vortex laser offers hope for Moore's Law

29.07.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Novel 'repair system' discovered in algae may yield new tools for biotechnology

29.07.2016 | Life Sciences

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>