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New composite protects from corrosion at high mechanical stress: presentation in Japan

19.01.2015

A new composite material which prevents metal corrosion in an environmentally friendly way, even under extreme conditions is presented. It can be used wherever metals are exposed to severe weather conditions, aggressive gases, media containing salt, heavy wear or high pressures.

The researchers from the INM- Leibniz Institute for New Materials will be presenting their results at the International Nanotechnology Exhibition and Conference nano tech 2015, Tokyo, Japan.


Corrosion protection with a new composite

Copyright: Uwe Bellhäuser, only free within this information

“This patented composite exhibits its action by spray application”, explains Carsten Becker-Willinger, Head of the Nanomers Program Division. “The key is the structuring of this layer - the protective particles arrange themselves like roof tiles. As in a wall, several layers of particles are placed on top of each other in an offset arrangement; the result is a self-organized, highly structured barrier”, says the chemical nanotechnology expert.

The protective layer is just a few micrometers thick and prevents penetration by gases and electrolytes. It provides protection against corrosion caused by aggressive aqueous solutions, including for example salt solutions such as salt spray on roads and seawater, or aqueous acids such as acid rain. The protective layer is an effective barrier, even against corrosive gases or under pressure.

After thermal curing, the composite adheres to the metal substrate, is abrasion-stable and impact-resistant. As a result, it can withstand high mechanical stress. The coating passes the falling ball test with a steel hemispherical ball weighing 1.5 kg from a height of one meter without chipping or breaking and exhibits only slight deformation, which means that the new material can be used even in the presence of sand or mineral dust without wear and tear.

The composite can be applied by spraying or other commonly used wet chemistry processes and cures at 150-200°C. It is suitable for steels, metal alloys and metals such as aluminum, magnesium and copper, and can be used to coat any shape of plates, pipes, gear wheels, tools or machine parts. The specially formulated mixture contains a solvent, a binder and nanoscale and platelet-like particles; it does not contain chromium VI or other heavy metals.

From January 28 to 30, the researchers of the INM present this and further results at the German Pavilion, Booth 5J-21. At the German Pavilion, the Association of German Engineers (VDI) will concentrate the expertise of all German exhibitors at the nano tech Exhibition. The German Pavilion is supported by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). An oral presentation on „Materials and Processing for functionalized Surfaces“ will take place at the Main Theater, Hall 5, on January 29, German Day.

Your contacts at the Booth:
Dr. Karsten Moh
Dr. Thomas Müller
Mareike Frensemeier

Your expert at the INM:
Dr. Carsten Becker-Willinger
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials
Head Nanomers®
Phone: +49681-9300-196
nanomere@inm-gmbh.de

INM conducts research and development to create new materials – for today, tomorrow and beyond. Chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers team up to focus on these essential questions: Which material properties are new, how can they be investigated and how can they be tailored for industrial applications in the future? Four research thrusts determine the current developments at INM: New materials for energy application, new concepts for medical surfaces, new surface materials for tribological applications and nano safety and nano bio. Research at INM is performed in three fields: Nanocomposite Technology, Interface Materials, and Bio Interfaces.
INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials, situated in Saarbruecken, is an internationally leading centre for materials research. It is an institute of the Leibniz Association and has about 195 employees.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.inm-gmbh.de/en
http://www.nanotech-tokyo.german-pavilion.com/content/en/home/home.php

Dr. Carola Jung | INM - Leibniz-Institut für Neue Materialien gGmbH

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