Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Laser cladding now four times faster

28.04.2010
Hybrid technology makes laser powder cladding even faster and more reliable.

At the LAM in Houston (Texas, USA) and the LASYS in Stuttgart (Germany), Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Laserline are presenting a highly productive, compact coaxial head for laser assisted cladding.

The induction module is arranged coaxially around the nozzle so that it’s fully omnidirectional. This arrangement of the hybrid cladding head offers increased performance, high ease of use, easy automation and high robustness.

Combining a solid-state laser (4 kW) with a locally integrated additional induction module (14 kW), the patented COAXpowerline head by Fraunhofer IWS enables deposition rates of 8 kg metallic powder per hour. Up to four times higher rates can be provided compared with a single 4 kW solid-state laser. Thus, even small lasers can reach deposition rates in the range of plasma transferred arc (PTA) surfacing, without undercuts and at mixing degrees below 8 %.

If one dares a view into the near future, technically and economically meaningful upper limits are to be expected at 10 kW diode laser power and 40 kW induction power. With this combination, deposition rates of up to 30 kg metallic powder per hour could be realized. The researchers of Fraunhofer IWS are looking forward to take on this challenging task.

With the COAXpowerline head the energetic overall efficiency can already be increased by more a factor of two. Where otherwise a 10 KW laser would be necessary, now a 4 kW laser will be sufficient! Thus, the investment costs per kW of total power can be reduced by at least 50%.

A further effect that characterizes the new system is the wider range of materials that can be processed. Simultaneous base material preheating enables the crack-free deposition of especially hard and wear resistant materials. Coatings with a hardness of up to 64 HRC can be reached precisely.

Like all COAXn systems, COAXpowerline provides omnidirectional energy and weld deposit feeding. Yet equipped with the additional induction module the cladding head remains very compact and can be applied regardless the geometry and size of the component. Furthermore, the camera based temperature control system ?E-MAqS? by Fraunhofer IWS can be coaxially integrated in the beam path. This on-line process control represents another unique feature in the market.

For more than twenty years, the Fraunhofer IWS has been developing processing heads for continuous powder and wire feeding. With these components, users are provided with advanced tools for laser cladding applications. During the last ten years, more than 80 systems have found their way into industrial production or research worldwide.

Your contact for further information:

Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS Dresden
(Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS Dresden)
01277 Dresden, Winterbergstraße 28, Germany
Dr. Steffen Nowotny (System Technology Laser Cladding)
Phone: +49 (0) 351 83391 3241
Fax: +49 (0) 351 83391 3300
E-mail: steffen.nowotny@iws.fraunhofer.de
Dr. Ralf Jäckel (Public Relations)
Phone: +49 (0) 351 83391 3444
Fax: +49 (0) 351 83391 3300
E-mail: ralf.jaeckel@iws.fraunhofer.de

Dr. Ralf Jaeckel | idw
Further information:
http://www.iws.fraunhofer.de
http://www.iws.fraunhofer.de/presse/presse.html

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht High Resolution Laser Structuring of Thin Films at LOPEC 2017
21.03.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht Open ecosystem for smart assistance systems
20.03.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>