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Fraunhofer IESE at embedded world 2010 in Nürnberg

Which solutions help to manage the diversity of software in a car? How can the remote central locking system of car doors be made more secure? Fraunhofer researchers from seven institutes will give you answers to these and many other questions in hall 11, booth 110 of the embedded world 2010 trade fair in Nürnberg from 02 to 04 March.

Everyone is talking about model-based development and code generation nowadays - with the help of domain-specific languages, developers can use these to obtain the highest possible benefit. At the joint booth of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, visitors to embedded world 2010 will be able to find out how this is done.

Many software defects are created when the solution idea is transferred into individual program logic structures and algorithms.

Domain-specific languages map the solution space to the problem world, i.e., they can do without transferring the solution idea into classical modeling languages or programming languages. Thus, the engineer can simply combine sensors and actuators with controls, for example, and formulate event chains in the application's nomenclature - the rest will be done by a generator, cost-efficiently and with predictable quality.

How such a domain-specific language can be developed easily, which tools are required to do so, and for which applications this technology is most suitable will be shown by Fraunhofer IESE at this year's embedded world.

Using unbalance detection as an example, it will be shown how complex concepts can be expressed and modified in a simple manner so that variants or system modifications become very easy.

These methods, which were developed in the context of the Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster for Digital Commercial Vehicle Technology, have already been used several times for product development and now have tool assistance for use in product development.

Alexander Rabe
Phone +49 (631) 6800 1002
Fraunhofer-Institut für Experimentelles Software Engineering IESE
Fraunhofer-Platz 1
67663 Kaiserslautern
Fraunhofer-Institute for Experimental Software Engineering
Fraunhofer IESE is one of the worldwide leading research institutes in the area of software and systems development. A major portion of the products offered by our collaboration partners is defined by software. These products range from automotive and transportation systems via information systems, health care and medical systems to software systems for the public sector. Our solutions allow flexible scaling. This makes us a competent technology partner for organizations of any size - from small companies to major corporations.
Under the leadership of Prof. Dieter Rombach and Prof. Peter Liggesmeyer, the past decade has seen us making major contributions to strengthening the emerging IT location Kaiserslautern.

In the Fraunhofer Information and Communication Technology Group, we are cooperating with other Fraunhofer institutes on developing trend-setting key technologies for the future. Fraunhofer IESE is one of 59 institutes of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. Together we have a major impact on shaping applied research in Europe and contribute to Germany's competitiveness in international markets.

Martin Koch | idw
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