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DuPont in collaboration with customers to get process efficiency up and system costs down with Kalrez® and Vespel® parts

Achema 2012, Frankfurt, Germany, DuPont,
Hall 9, Stand C13
At Achema 2012, DuPont representatives demonstrated how DuPont™ Kalrez® perfluoroelastomer parts and DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 parts enable chemical processors to sustainably improve their system efficiency, reliability and safety while reducing system cost. DuPont works together with customers to achieve optimum sealing solutions and durable wear solutions for very demanding chemical and hydrocarbon processing, and food and pharmaceutical applications.

“By using Kalrez® seals and Vespel® CR-6100 wear parts, process and rotating equipment, engineers can meet requirements for greater safety, reliability and productivity in their processes. These products can help increase MTBR (mean time between repairs) and reduce total system cost when used in a wide range of chemical processing industry equipment,” said Cedric Triquet, European Segment Lead, Kalrez® parts.

Savings in total system costs

DuPont™ Kalrez® perfluoroelastomer parts such as O-rings, gaskets, valve seats and diaphragms can withstand aggressive chemicals and maintain tight seals over a very wide temperature range. DuPont representatives provided case history examples from several global chemical companies and high-tech process pump manufacturers supporting the ability of Kalrez® seals to save from 10% to 200% in total system running costs in chemical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical processes. Data on file showed that seal lifetimes of O-rings in an aggressive chemical process were about six months for non-perfluoroelastomer O-rings and about three years for Kalrez®, leading to savings of 98% in cost of O-ring seals, installation, downtime and loss of productivity.

Photo: DuPont
DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 wear parts and Kalrez® seals can help increase process system reliability, safety and productivity.

For the broadest possible chemical resistance, engineers turn to Kalrez® Spectrum™ 6375 parts because they can withstand most aggressive chemical families including acids, amines, bases, aldehydes, ethylene oxide, hot water and steam at service temperatures up to 275 °C.

To meet stringent cleanliness requirements in United States Food and Drug Administration compliant food and pharmaceutical applications, specifiers can use Kalrez® 6221 or 6230 seals to help protect process purity. These Kalrez® seals combine exceptional cleanliness with near-universal chemical resistance and outstanding elastomeric properties.

Improving pump efficiency and reliability
DuPont™ Vespel® CR-6100 parts such as wear rings have a proven record of success in pumps and other equipment for the chemical and hydrocarbon processing industries, and can deliver substantial improvements in pump reliability and energy efficiency at significantly less cost than currently available alternatives. They combine outstanding chemical resistance with low wear, low friction and extreme toughness, enabling the parts to survive long duration run-dry conditions, cryogenic service from -253°C to 'non abrasive' high temperature service at +288°C.
Cryogenic to high temperature sealing

Vespel® parts are available in other grades developed for specific applications. Vespel® SP-21 valve seats maintain a highly effective seal at cryogenic temperatures from -163 °C in liquefied natural gas (LNG) to as low as -269 °C (4K) in helium, for example. Remarkably, the same material maintains a compliant seal without detectable phase transitions up to continuous use temperatures of +300 °C.

Compressor applications

The DuPont™ Vespel® SCP family offers a step change in the performance of compressor piston rings, packing rings and rider bands, versus traditional materials such as PEEK and PTFE. Vespel® SCP-50094 parts demonstrate exceptional un-lubricated limiting PV capability of 17.5MPa.m/s in continuous use temperatures up to 325 °C, with compressive strength comparable to carbon steel. Vespel® SCP-5050 offers similar high performance with a coefficient of thermal expansion in the same range as stainless steel. The Vespel® product family includes grades for use in wet, dry and bone dry gases both lubricated and un-lubricated.

Vespel® CR-6100 parts also provide high temperature capability and outstanding chemical resistance in halogens and other difficult gases, making them suitable for compressor valve plate applications. High fatigue resistance, excellent flatness, and the strength and stiffness to survive high pressures coupled with a compliant sealing surface enable Vespel® CR-6100 parts to maintain a tight seal over a very wide temperature range.
DuPont (NYSE: DD) has been bringing world-class science and engineering to the global marketplace in the form of innovative products, materials, and services since 1802. The company believes that by collaborating with customers, governments, NGOs, and thought leaders we can help find solutions to such global challenges as providing enough healthy food for people everywhere, decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, and protecting life and the environment. For additional information about DuPont and its commitment to inclusive innovation, please visit

The DuPont Oval Logo, DuPont™, The miracles of science™ and all product names denoted with a ® are registered trademarks or trademarks of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company or its affiliates.


Editorial contact:
Nicole Savioz
Tel: +41 22 717 4042
Fax + 41 22 580 27 91

Nicole Savioz | DuPont
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