Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

NMDA Antagonists as new Antidiabetics - Clinically tested compounds

14.02.2013
Diabetes mellitus is the most expensive chronic disorder, causing costs of about 40 billion Euros in 2010. More than 3/4 of these costs are associated with the treatment of subsequent disorders; chronic hyperglycaemia is deemed to be an independent risk factor for several severe health effects.

Therapy of type 2 diabetes aims at reducing the chronically increased glucose level in the blood as well as improving the existing insulin resistance. Oral antidiabetic drugs that have been currently available so far are problematic and not satisfactory in every respect. Blood glucose levels can be decreased in patients with manifested type 2 diabetes by administration of sulfonyl-urea/metformin or insulin. However, such treatment is associated with a high risk of hypoglycaemia. In addition, sulfonylureas are associated with an increased risk of mortality, in particular when combined with metformin. DDP-4 inhibitors have a low risk of hypoglycaemia, but merely lead to a slight improvement of the HbA1c-value compared to metformin. Further, there is no long-term evidence as to tolerability and mortality. Most long-term experiences are available for metformin. It is particularly effective in overweight diabetics and reduces diabetes complications and mortality by about 30%. However, monotherapy is typically effective only in the beginning of the treatment. Morphinan-derivatives have been known as medicaments for many years. The compounds have shown only minor adverse events upon long term administration and thus, are generally well tolerated.

It has now been surprisingly found that the morphinan-derivatives according to the invention increase the secretion of insulin only at elevated glucose concentrations in mouse and humans. If the glucose concentration is within the physiologically normal range, however, insulin secretion is not induced. Moreover, in type 2 diabetic mice, morphinans improve the viability of pancreatic beta cells that secrete insulin.

Further Information: PDF

PROvendis GmbH
Phone: +49 (0)208/94105 10

Contact
Dipl.-Ing. Alfred Schillert

info@technologieallianz.de | TechnologieAllianz e.V.
Further information:
http://www.technologieallianz.de/angebote.php?sort=sag&id=3037&lang=en
http://www.technologieallianz.de

More articles from Technology Offerings:

nachricht Flexible plasma electrode design for effective treatment of irregular surfaces
25.07.2016 | TechnologieAllianz e.V.

nachricht Treatment of Varieties of Dermatitis and Malassezia Yeasts
25.07.2016 | TechnologieAllianz e.V.

All articles from Technology Offerings >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

28.07.2016 | Information Technology

New material could advance superconductivity

28.07.2016 | Materials Sciences

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>