Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Inexpensive Enhancement of High-Resolution 3-D Fluorescence Microscopy: FAM Fluorescence Activation Microscopy

Optical setups using two opposing micro-objectives have been propagated to enhance the axial resolution in 3-dimensional fluorescence microscopy using various illumination schemes. However, the coherent superposition of two counter propagating beams creates imaging artifacts, i.e. more or less pronounced side-maxima, which can only be effectively removed by arithmetic op-erations if their intensity is less than 50% of the main maximum.

Fluorescence Activation Microscopy (FAM) is a new alternative 3D fluorescence image technique besides the existing confocal or 2-photon excita-tion microscopy. In FAM, photo activatable dyes are used, so that improved axial resolution is achieved solely by the illumination beams in very much the same way than in 2-photon excitation and in contrast to the regular confocal case. In FAM, however, it is not relevant whether point, line or other structured illumination patterns are used as long as activation and excitation are applied simultaneously, permitting the use of devices such as micro lens arrays, birefringent devices, SLMs, LCD or DMD projectors, LED arrays, holographic pattern generators etc, so FAM enables optical sectioning without necessarily requiring confocal optics or 2-photon excitation. Together with fluorescent proteins such as DRONPA fast 3d life cell imaging also becomes possible. Calculated point spread functions (PSF) suggest that this method may perfect other high resolution imaging techniques such as 4Pi, STED and PALM additionally by introducing an axial resolution in the 70nm range.

Further Information: PDF

DKFZ (German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum)
Phone: +49-6221-42 2955

Dr. Ruth Herzog | TechnologieAllianz e.V.
Further information:

All articles from Technology Offerings >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Greater Range and Longer Lifetime

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VDI presents International Bionic Award of the Schauenburg Foundation

26.10.2016 | Awards Funding

3-D-printed magnets

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>