Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UCLA researches heart disease-glucose connection

15.02.2006


Men with cardiovascular disease may be at considerably increased risk for death even when their blood sugar level remains in the "normal" range, suggests a new study by a team of scientists at UCLA and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The study, a statistical analysis examining the connection between glucose (blood sugar) levels and death in patients with cardiovascular disease, will be published Feb. 15 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the leading scientific journal in its field.



Cardiovascular disease includes coronary heart disease, stroke, angina and peripheral vascular disease. Currently, doctors consider a glucose level of 100 or less to be normal, 101–126 to be impaired and above 126 to be diabetic.

"Our findings suggest that for men with cardiovascular disease, there is apparently no ’normal’ blood sugar level," said Sidney Port, UCLA professor emeritus of mathematics and statistics, and lead author of the study. "For these men, across the normal range, the lower their blood sugar, the better. Their death rate over a two-year period soars from slightly more than 4 percent at a glucose level of 70 (mg/dl) to more than 12 percent at 100 (mg/dl) -- an enormous increase."


Surprisingly, however, and contrary to conventional belief, above 100 (mg/dl), their risk does not seem to change -- it stays at the same high level -- no matter how high above the normal range, Port said. Their death rate at 100 and 150 is the same. Although these data suggest that blood sugar for men with cardiovascular disease should be as low as possible, co-author Mark Goodarzi, assistant professor-in-residence at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Division of Endocrinology, cautions that their study by no means proves that deliberately lowering glucose would reduce mortality.

"Such a fact can be established only by a suitable clinical trial" Goodarzi said.

Currently, no such trials are scheduled.

In another surprising result that Port and his co-authors cannot explain, women with cardiovascular disease show a dramatically different response from men. "For women, we found no evidence of any change in risk across the normal range, from 70 to 100, but then their risk seems to rise quickly through the impaired range and continues to increase with higher glucose in the diabetic range; therefore a blood sugar level of 100 seems to be a sensible cut point for women with cardiovascular disease."

"Why there should be such a profound difference between men and women with respect to how glucose affects mortality in the presence of atherosclerosis is a mystery that needs to be further pursued," Goodarzi said. "To date, we and colleagues we have consulted can offer no explanation."

"These large gender differences may have previously remained undetected because earlier studies looked either at men and women together or a younger, healthier group of men," said Port, whose study analyzed men and women with cardiovascular disease separately. "If you look at men and women combined, you get a highly distorted picture because they respond so differently."

Using extensive heart study data from the town of Framingham, Mass., collected every second year since 1948, Port and his co-authors performed a sophisticated statistical analysis, which made adjustments for factors such as the patients’ cholesterol levels, blood pressure, cigarette smoking, body mass index and antihypertensive drug use. The researchers analyzed more than 1,200 people (686 men and 517 women), ages 45 to 74, diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Because the researchers’ statistical technique allowed them to take advantage of the fact that many patients were examined over multiple two-year periods, they report on more than 3,800 observations.

In a follow-up study, they are analyzing whether blood sugar levels are linked with death or development of cardiovascular disease in people who have not been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.

Stuart Wolpert | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ucla.edu

More articles from Statistics:

nachricht 3% more academic staff at higher education institutions
03.07.2015 | Statistisches Bundesamt

nachricht Number of habilitations up 4% in 2014
17.06.2015 | Statistisches Bundesamt

All articles from Statistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: OU astrophysicist and collaborators find supermassive black holes in quasar nearest Earth

A University of Oklahoma astrophysicist and his Chinese collaborator have found two supermassive black holes in Markarian 231, the nearest quasar to Earth, using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of two supermassive black holes--one larger one and a second, smaller one--are evidence of a binary black hole and suggests that supermassive...

Im Focus: What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?

A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean. The results show how tsunami waves could hit and inundate coastal areas in southern Italy and Greece. The study is published today (27 August) in Ocean Science, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

Though not as frequent as in the Pacific and Indian oceans, tsunamis also occur in the Mediterranean, mainly due to earthquakes generated when the African...

Im Focus: Self-healing landscape: landslides after earthquake

In mountainous regions earthquakes often cause strong landslides, which can be exacerbated by heavy rain. However, after an initial increase, the frequency of these mass wasting events, often enormous and dangerous, declines, in fact independently of meteorological events and aftershocks.

These new findings are presented by a German-Franco-Japanese team of geoscientists in the current issue of the journal Geology, under the lead of the GFZ...

Im Focus: FIC Proteins Send Bacteria Into Hibernation

Bacteria do not cease to amaze us with their survival strategies. A research team from the University of Basel's Biozentrum has now discovered how bacteria enter a sleep mode using a so-called FIC toxin. In the current issue of “Cell Reports”, the scientists describe the mechanism of action and also explain why their discovery provides new insights into the evolution of pathogens.

For many poisons there are antidotes which neutralize their toxic effect. Toxin-antitoxin systems in bacteria work in a similar manner: As long as a cell...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer IPA develops prototype of intelligent care cart

It comes when called, bringing care utensils with it and recording how they are used: Fraunhofer IPA is developing an intelligent care cart that provides care staff with physical and informational support in their day-to-day work. The scientists at Fraunhofer IPA have now completed a first prototype. In doing so, they are continuing in their efforts to improve working conditions in the care sector and are developing solutions designed to address the challenges of demographic change.

Technical assistance systems can improve the difficult working conditions in residential nursing homes and hospitals by helping the staff in their work and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

Large agribusiness management strategies

19.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Interstellar seeds could create oases of life

28.08.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

An ounce of prevention: Research advances on 'scourge' of transplant wards

28.08.2015 | Health and Medicine

Fish Oil-Diet Benefits May be Mediated by Gut Microbes

28.08.2015 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>