Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Rio+20: Climate protection and poverty reduction both depend on a new global treaty

05.06.2012
The Rio+20 summit could help pave the way towards a new global accord that links the crucial issues of climate protection and prosperity.
“If the world wants to mitigate dangerous climate change, the discussions in Rio have to go beyond the very broad sustainability issue and the very narrow green growth notion,” says Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), who is going to attend the summit.

Scientists of PIK and the Institute for Social and Development Studies (IGP), together with the organization for development cooperation Misereor and the Munich Re Foundation, point out key options for linking climate and development policy in a new book now published. It provides scientific input for the runup to Rio+20 and provides pathways to solve the climate change challenge in a fair way.

“As climate policy currently seems stuck in paralysis, science might bring the impulse to recreate momentum,” Schellnhuber says. “Raising awareness about the planetary boundaries and providing options to tackle global warming are key to finding sustainable development pathways and greening the millennium goals.” To this end, Schellnhuber will be co-chairing an interdisciplinary Nobel Laureates Panel in Rio.

While the policy target to limit global warming to less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels has become an important reference point in the international climate policy arena, a suitable policy framework for achieving this target is still under debate. The new book develops such a framework, but also looks at costs and risks. Today, “the atmosphere has to be seen as a global common – so its management is an economic challenge, but also a crucial matter of global justice,” says Ottmar Edenhofer, chief economist of PIK. “While socio-economic development up to now has been closely coupled to emission increases, we try to show that a new growth path is possible.”

The much applauded concept of green growth alone will not be sufficient, says Edenhofer. It needs to be complemented by a global policy framework of binding emission reductions which sets long-term incentives for investments. Edenhofer and his co-authors in their book outline a post-2012 treaty. It involves a global cap-and-trade scheme for emission allowances, public support for technology transfer to developing countries, measures including payments to reduce emissions from deforestation, and financial support for adaptation in least developed countries.

“Poor people are especially vulnerable to climate change,“ Thomas Loster of Munich Re Foundation says. “Since 1980, more than 80% of the people killed by weather extremes lived in developing countries, our data shows.” To increase the resilience of populations hit by climate-change-related droughts or floods, he argues, microinsurance for instance offers an opportunity to deal with shocks. “So financial instruments could be an important part of adaptation,” he says. “But a new risk perception is needed - both locally and globally.”

“The fight against poverty and against climate change will be won – or lost – together,” says Bernd Bornhorst of Misereor. As an organization for development cooperation, “we see in our daily work how development in poor countries is closely linked to combating global warming.” The new book “provides both glasses for the short-sighted and a map indicating ways towards sustainable development,” he says. But what is known about the preparations for Rio+20 in many states “raises doubts that those gathering in Brazil are really willing to turn towards sustainability.”

“With an appropriate design and implementation, the post-2012 treaty we propose in the book could also support the poor,” Johannes Müller of IGP points out. “The outcome in terms of climate change mitigation, adaptation, and sustainable development would be effective, efficient, and equitable.”

Book: Edenhofer, O.; Wallacher, J.; Lotze-Campen, H.; Reder, M.; Knopf, B.; Müller, J. (Eds.): Climate Change, Justice and Sustainability – Linking Climate and Development Policy. Springer, June 2012, ISBN 978-94-007-4539-1

Weblink to book:
http://www.springer.com/earth+sciences+and+geography/earth+system+sciences/
book/978-94-007-4539-1

For further information please contact:
PIK press office
Phone: +49 331 288 25 07
E-Mail: press@pik-potsdam.de

Mareike Schodder | PIK Potsdam
Further information:
http://www.pik-potsdam.de

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

Im Focus: Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.

Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds. Molecules and sections of macromolecules are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

Media accreditation opens for historic year at European Health Forum Gastein

16.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen

22.05.2017 | Materials Sciences

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus

22.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan

22.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>