Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Why education really is for life

26.10.2007
International symposium at University of Leicester to be told how lifelong learning helps older people cope with modern society and increases their sense of self worth.

A three-day international symposium is to highlight how lifelong learning provides older people with a new lease of life as well as delivering wider benefits to society.

Delegates from around the world are gathering for a meeting of the Council of the International Association of Universities of the Third Age (IAUTA) from 29-31 October.

The University of Leicester’s Institute of Lifelong Learning is co-ordinating the event which will include members from countries as far apart as Chile, China, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and the United States of America.

Professor John Benyon, Director of Lifelong Learning at the University of Leicester, said: “Lifelong learning activities help to improve the well-being of older people, and also benefit the whole of society. For example, lifelong learning courses can increase older people’s knowledge and confidence to enable them to stay active and cope with changes in modern society and this brings wider benefits in all sorts of ways. The University of the Third Age does a tremendous job in many different countries and in the UK the U3A is growing fast.

“There is a huge demand for education from people over 50, but government policies appear to have downgraded courses for older people. When I first came into Adult Education 25 years ago, the majority of our programmes were non-accredited courses and the world was not a worse place for that. I will go to my grave saying there is nothing wrong with wanting to learn for the sake of it. Education for education’s sake is a good thing – it enriches the lives of individuals and communities. However, since we are not funded for non-accredited courses we have to make them self-funding which inevitably excludes those who cannot afford the fees and limits the sorts of courses that we can put on.”

IAUTA was founded in 1976 with the aim of encouraging the further development of Universities of the Third Age (U3As) in individual countries and of enabling U3As to share their experiences for their mutual benefit. One of the central tasks of the Executive is to plan and organise the biennial congress of IAUTA.

Its President, Stanley Miller, was a student of the University College, Leicester in the 1950s and became President of the Students’ Union in 1957. He returns to Leicester as the University celebrates the 50th anniversary of the granting of its Royal Charter.

Members will assemble at the University of Leicester on 29 October and, in addition to their business sessions, they will hear about the work of the University and the Institute of Lifelong Learning and will take part in a seminar organised jointly with NIACE on ‘Later-life Learning’.

The international guests will visit Vaughan College, to learn more about its work, and will attend a reception hosted by Professor Robert Burgess, the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Leicester. Given the significance of the meeting, and its international dimension, the Lord Mayor of Leicester, Councillor Gary Hunt, will be hosting a reception for the delegates at the Town Hall on 30 October.

Professor Benyon said ‘The Institute of Lifelong Learning is delighted to be hosting this prestigious international meeting and it seems particularly appropriate to be doing this when the President of IAUTA has such a strong connection with our own University and City.’

Ather Mirza | alfa
Further information:
http://www.le.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Illinois researchers researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected
21.02.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Polluted air may pollute our morality
08.02.2018 | Association for Psychological Science

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formation

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracy

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>